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PRESENTS

THE MAVERICK FORUM FAQ

Rev 05/01/08

ANCHORS

  1. What are the better anchors for my boat?
  2. How can I keep my anchor from hanging up and getting stuck on the rocks?
  3. I hate hauling my anchor up from 50’ by hand.  Other than installing an electric winch, is there an easier way that will save my back?

 

BAITWELLS

  1. How do I keep water from coming into the bait wells of a 2005 MA 17?  I have turned the valves off via the access hatch but I still get about 2” of water in both wells.

 

BATTERIES

  1. I plan to use my trolling motor a lot when I go Tarpon fishing.  What trolling motor and battery combination will give me the longest run time?
  2. Why does Yamaha dislike Optima batteries?  I spoke to a national Yamaha rep the other day about the Optima batteries and the guy gave me "double talk" without really saying "WHY”.
  3. Is there any real concern over fumes from the battery being ignited by accessories or switches, etc. when batteries are located in the console?
  4. How do I securely mount 2 batteries under the console?
  5. How do I set up my batteries for a 24 Volt trolling motor?
  6. What size battery should I buy for my F150 Yamaha?
  7. Should I recharge my trolling motor batteries as soon as I return from fishing?  Or should I wait until just prior to my next trip?
  8. What is the proper way to utilize my battery selector switch?  Do you keep it on 1, 2, or both?   Do you change the switch setting throughout the day or alternate which one you use each time out?

 

BATTERY CHARGERS

  1. Should I get an on-board or a portable charger?  My knowledge regarding battery chargers is limited.

 

BILGE PUMPS

  1. Are there any specs for bilge pump placement?  My 2001 17’ Maverick Master Angler seems to have a float problem.  However, I am unable to locate the pump.
  2. Why is my bilge pump running so often?
  3. How is my automatic bilge pump wired?

 

BOARDING LADDERS

  1. What is a good boarding ladder setup for my PF 2200V?

 

BOAT COVERS

  1. What is the best way to clean my Boat Cover?
  2. What is a fair price for a T-Top boat cover on a Pathfinder 2200V?

 

CLEATS

  1. Does anybody know how to tighten a “pull up” cleat?  One of mine is so loose that, in addition to not staying up when pulled up, it vibrates making a very annoying noise at cruising speed.

 

CORROSION PROTECTION

1.      How can I prevent the accumulation of rust on my boat and its parts?

 

DEPTH FINDERS

  1. How do I install a shoot-through-the-hull transducer?

 

DESTINATIONS

  1. Where are some good places to Bonefish in the Bahamas?

 

 ELECTRICAL WIRING AND COMPONENTS

  1. What is the make and model of the toggle switch for my bilge pump and where can I find it?  I have no power going to my bilge pump and/or courtesy lights via my toggle switch.  I know the pump works, because I can manually turn on the bilge pump via the float switch.  
  2. Where do the wires attached to the ACC switches lead?  All of the terminals on my electrical panel rocker switches already have wires attached to them (even the unused ACC switches).
  3. How do I add Courtesy Lights to my 2001 2200V?
  4. How do you add additional pumps to the switch panel?
  5. Are there any pictures or is there a chart showing what fuse runs which circuit?
  6. How do I feed a new wire from the console to the bilge?  There is no string available.
  7. Is there a color code standard for wiring in marine electrical applications?

 

ETHANOL ISSUES

  1. What are the Pros and Cons of using Ethanol fuel in marine motors?

 

FISHING

  1. How do I make a marker to mark my fishing spots?
  2. Is there a good landing net that will fit on my flats boat?  I don’t have much space for a big one.
  3. What is the best way to remove a hook embedded in my skin?

 

GARAGEABLE BOATS

  1. What boats/trailers are able to be stored in the garage?

 

GAUGES

  1. Why does the fuel gauge on my 2005 F115 RF16 only show the bottom LED flashing even after a fill up?  I have checked the dip switches on the gauge and they all appear correct according to the manual.  What do I start checking next?
  2. How do I install a new set of Yamaha Digital Multifunction gauges?

 

GELCOAT REPAIR

  1. Where do I purchase the correct color of Gelcoat for my hull?

 

GPS

  1. Why does my GPS blink off sometimes when starting up the motor?  It doesn’t do it every time though.

 

HEWES BOATS

  1. Why does my 1996 18’ Redfisher with a 130 HP seem like its squatting too much?  Is it normal on these boats?
  2. Will a hydrofoil on the motor help lift the back end out of the water, decreasing drag and thus increasing top end?  I have a 1997 19' Redfisher Tunnel Drive with a 2002 Suzuki 140 four stroke 4 blade SS.  Top end at 6000 RPM is 33-34 MPH.  I have been told on many occasions that it is just the nature of the beast.  I know with any tunnel hull there is a significant trade off between top end and running skinny water.  While I do not expect to hit 50 MPH, if I could get to 40 MPH I would be pretty pleased.
  3. Have there been any design changes to the 18’ Redfisher hull from 1995-1999?
  4. When did the factory quit using wood in construction of boats?  I’m looking at a used Hewes boat for purchase.  
  5. What is the difference between the 17’ Maverick Master Angler and the 18’ Redfisher?
  6. What is the difference between the Tailfisher versus the Redfisher 16’.
  7. I’d like to know how the 18’ Redfisher performs.  How does it ride?  Is it poleable?  What are some specs with a 150 V MAX and F150? What is the price range?
  8. What is the best power for the 18’ Redfisher?
  9. What are the Pros and Cons of the 21' Redfisher?

 

JACK PLATES

  1. Why doesn’t Hewes put Jack Plates on the RF 16'?

 

KNOTS

  1. How do I tie the Slim Beauty?
  2. How do I tie the Yucatan Knot for attaching leaders to Power Pro?
  3. How do I tie an Albright Knot in Power Pro and keep it from slipping loose?

 

LATCHES

  1. Which tension latch was offered on the 2001 17’ Master Angler?  Local dealers didn't have them in stock but were helpful in trying to find them.  I found the OEM parts on Southco's Website.  5lb and 10lb tension latches of the same design are offered.

 

LAWS AND REGULATIONS

  1. Is my boat required to have a Coast Guard rating sticker attached?  I bought a used 2000 Maverick HPX-17 tunnel a little over a year ago.  I just realized that is not there.

 

LIVEWELLS

  1. What is the best way to provide raw water to my Bayfisher’s center live well?  I am good to go except for an overflow drain.  I am leaning towards a 1.5 inch overflow through the back of the well that will drain into the motor well and then out the plug holes.  I have seen some mention of a standpipe, but am not familiar with that setup.

 

LENCO TRIM TABS

1.      How do I replace a bad Lenco actuator?

2.      How do I find out why both of my trim tabs quit working?  There doesn’t seem to be any power to the switches.

3.      How do I figure out why one of my trim tabs quit working?

 

MAVERICK BOATS

  1. What is the top end speed on the 18' Master Angler with a 175 HP Motor?  I've seen the performance bulletin with a F150 but not a 175. Will she run 60 plus?
  2. How do Maverick and Hewes compare to each other in the MHP lineup?  It seems to me that Maverick's and Hewe’s fill many of the same product niches.  
  3. Would there be an issue by trying to install a 17 MA console in a 18.5 MA?
  4. Does the 2000 17’ Master Angler have a metal tank and what is its capacity?
  5. What are the differences between the 15’ HPX and 17’ HPX-T?
  6. What are the differences between the 17’ HPX and 18’ HPX?
  7. When was the style of gunnel rod holders changed on the Master Angler 17 and 18.5?  The older style is where they are an integral part of the hull with "cut outs" where one can see the foam core.  The newer style plastic holders are bolted onto the hull under the gunnels.
  8. What kind of top speed can be obtained with the 17’ Master Angler and a Yamaha F115?
  9. What is the best prop set up for the 17’ HPX-V?
  10. What is the best motor for the 17’ HPX-V?
  11. What are the pros and cons of a side console on the 17’ HPXV?
  12. How tippy is the 17’ HPXV?
  13. What is the best height position for a Yamaha 60 HP four stroke on the HPX-T?

 

MOTORS

  1. Where can I get information on my Yamaha Motor?  I don’t have my Owner’s Manual.
  2. How do I fix my trim indicator that quit working?
  3. How do I fix the trim tab switch on a Quicksilver throttle?
  4. How do I stop the loud squealing noise on my F115 when trimming it up and down?
  5. How do I fix the low oil message on my Yamaha gauge?  The reservoir is ¾ full, but the tank on the motor is ¼ full.  After waiting about 10 minutes, it will run for another 10 minutes and then the low oil message reappears.  It seems that the oil is not being pumped into the motor tank fast enough.
  6. Why is my water pressure gauge only reading around 10 psi since it normally reads around 25 psi?  It happened after the overheating alarm went off due to accumulating grass over the water intake.
  7. What is involved in doing my own Yamaha motor maintenance and what are the costs?
  8. How do I change the lower unit oil on my Yamaha four stroke?
  9. How do I change the oil and oil filter on my Yamaha 4 stroke motor?
  10. How do I change my spark plugs on my Yamaha motor?
  11. How do I change the gas filter on my Yamaha motor?
  12. How do I lubricate the zerk fittings on my Yamaha motor?

 

NAVMAN 2100

  1. What is involved in a new Navman installation?
  2. Is my Navman 2100 broken?  When I turn on the ignition switch, I hit Flow.  When I run ful,l I’ve seen the flow at almost 70.  When I hit total, it remains at 0.0 for the whole day, not moving.

 

PATHFINDER BOATS

  1. What is the fix for the water intrusion problem on the 22’ Pathfinder?  My feet are wet constantly.
  2. What is the best power for the PF2200?
  3. What is the best power for the PF2400?

 

POLING PLATFORMS

  1. Does anyone know of a rail or handle that can be used to lean on or stabilize yourself while on the poling platform?  I'd really like to be able to stand up there and concentrate on fishing versus balancing.

 

POWER POLE

  1. Can a Power Pole be mounted on a 16’ Redfisher?  It seems that there is very little room.
  2. Can an average guy install a Power Pole by himself?
  3. What is the best length Power Pole to install on a HPX-T?

 

PROPS

  1. What size prop should I run on my 20’ Pathfinder?
  2. What size prop should I run on my 22’ Pathfinder?
  3. What size prop should I run on my 21’ Redfisher with a Yamaha VMAX 250 HPDI?
  4. What size prop should I run on my 17 HPXV with a Yamaha 90 2 stroke?
  5. Can a prop from a 2002 150 V MAX HPDI fit a 2004 F150?  I have two different motors and I’d like to be able to use it on both, if need be.

 

PUSH POLES

  1. What should I do to my push pole to keep from getting stuck with that itchy fiberglass?  The outside coating has taken a beating from the sun and now every time I use it, I get what feels like fiberglass all over my chest and arms.

 

RECIPES

  1. What are some of your favorite recipes for preparing fish?

 

ROD HOLDERS

  1. Where can I get quality rod holders for my poling platform?
  2. Where can I buy those flat blade rod holders that attach to the gunnels sides?

 

STAIN REMOVAL

1.   How do I remove rust stains from the gel coat?

 

STEERING

  1. How do I fill and bleed my Teleflex steering system?
  2. Why is my hydraulic steering hard to turn at speed but turns easily at idle?
  3. How do I determine what type of thread is on my steering wheel shaft?

 

TOOLS FOR REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE

  1. What tools do you carry on board with you?
  2. What tools do you carry on your tow vehicle for trailer repair?

 

TOWING

  1. What is the technique and equipment required for towing a flats boat behind a mother ship?

 

TRAILER LIGHTING

  1. Has anyone found a trailer light brand that lasts?  I am on going on my third set of taillights. They continue to fill up with water after 3-4 months.

 

TROLLING MOTORS 

  1. What size and kind of trolling motor should I install on my Mirage HPX?
  2. I’d like to know how well the Minn Kota Autopilot with the wireless Copilot works.  Do you still have the ability with the Auto Pilot to manually steer, i.e. literally grab the motor head and move it around with your hand?
  3. How important will the positioning of two relatively heavy items be on the HPX17T?  I will soon be adding a 52 lb thrust Minn Kota trolling motor and a 6’ Power Pole.  Can you put the push pole and the trolling motor on the same side of the HPX?
  4. Which manufacturer is better, Minn Kota or MotorGuide?
  5. Who makes the best trolling motor mount for my application?  I plan to have my trolling motor off most of the time.  I want one that is small, flush and secure.  It needs to be lockable for the times when I travel, leaving the boat and motor outside and unattended.  I would rather not take it off each time, although a system that is easy to remove would be ok for secure storage.
  6. What is the best plug and receptacle to use for my trolling motor?
  7. What is the difference between the Minn Kota “Bow Guard” and the “Latch and Door” designs?
  8. On what side of the bow should I mount the Trolling Motor?
  9. Will the Minn Kota Quick Release mount work for Motor Guide Motors?
  10. How do I connect my 24 volt Trolling Motor?

 



 

What are the better anchors for my boat?

 

o       For 22’ Pathfinder -14 lb Danforth with 6’ chain connected to 150’ of anchor rope.

o       Sea Claw  with 5’ chain

o       Sea Claw with no chain

o       Aluminum Guardian

o       For the light danforth style anchors, the opinion is unanimous for using around 5’ of chain.  For the Sea Claw, most users have found that no chain is necessary.

 

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How can I keep my anchor from hanging up and getting stuck on the rocks?

 

o       For a danforth style anchor, drill a hole in the opposite end of the shaft where you should connect the chain. Not in the shaft, but in one of the tabs on the end. Connect the chain to this hole with a shackle. So now you have the anchor basically hooked up backwards. Now put another shackle in the hole where you would attach the chain. Before you deploy the anchor, run the chain up to the forward shackle and secure with a zip tie. When it is time to pull the anchor and if it’s stuck, the zip tie will break and you can pull the anchor out backwards. There is less damage to bottom and less damage to your back.  For a Sea Claw style anchor, the hole is already available.

 

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I hate hauling my anchor up from 50’ by hand.  Other than installing an electric winch, is there an easier way that will save my back?

 

o       T-H Marine has an Anchor Retrieving System as shown on the West Marine Website.  Place the anchor ring over your anchor line, attach the anchor ball, lower the ball overboard, and run a slow course 30-45 degrees away from the anchor. This will move the ball down the anchor line to the anchor, pulling it free, and floating it to the surface.

 

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How do I keep water from coming into the baitwells of a 2005 MA 17?  I have turned the valves off via the access hatch but I still get about 2” of water in both wells.

 

o       Replace the Marelon valves with brass gate valves.  Both of my Marelon valves "stuck" and wound up not being able to be closed all the way.  When underway, I would pick up a few gallons of water.

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company states “Water is coming back in through the drains. Plug the drain holes and the wells should stay dry.”

 

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I plan to use my trolling motor a lot when I go Tarpon fishing.  What trolling motor and battery combination will give me the longest run time?

 

o       If you must have long running time for chasing tarpon, then the ideal system would be a 36 volt trolling motor.  If your only option is the 12 or 24 volt trolling motor, then go with the 24 volt system.  Basically, the higher the voltage, the more efficient the trolling motor will be as it will consume less amps at a given speed.

o       The next consideration is to obtain as much amp hour capacity as you can.  If desired, you can connect 6 volt batteries in parallel and then in series to make the needed 36/24/12 volt system that you select.  However, most marine setups utilize 12 volt batteries.  You need be only constrained by weight and space.

o       In order to extend your battery time while on the water, you might also want to go with quick rechargeable batteries.  The AGMS, like Optima, Odyssey and Trojan combined with a DualPro Extreme Charger will allow you to quickly recharge from the outboard motor when on the water 

 

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Why does Yamaha dislike Optima batteries?  I spoke to a national Yamaha rep the other day about the Optima batteries and the guy gave me "double talk" without really saying "WHY”.

 

o       Hamfisted states “There are no issues with the Lifeline AGM’s and the HPDIs or any other motor. I would imagine the Optimas and Odysseys are the same.  I've found that some shops bad mouth the AGMs simply because they don't sell them. They like to push Interstates or some other brand because low and behold that's what they carry in stock.  You can usually find all that information on the battery manufacturer's website just to be sure.”

o       Yamaha is concerned with the AGMs, Optima in particular because of the low internal resistance of the battery.  The battery is able to take a huge amount of Amps, pushing the Yamaha charging system such that Yamaha fears that the electronics required for motor operation may not be sufficiently powered.  They can’t prove it and are vague in their response probably because they don’t want to incur a lawsuit.

 

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Is there any real concern over fumes from the battery being ignited by accessories or switches, etc. when batteries are located in the console?

 

o       If you are using flooded cells, here are a few suggestions:

         1. Leave the console door open when charging.
2. Never charge with a boat cover on the console or boat.
3. Unplug charger when you are going to fiddle with switches, etc.
4. If you smell something, be sure to air it out.

o       Invest in Lifeline, Odyssey. Optima or Trojan AGM’s and quit worrying about it.

 

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How do I securely mount 2 batteries under the console?

 

o       Mount a 3/8” starboard under the batteries for floor support and attach battery straps to it.  Use ¼” SS screws with liberal amounts of GE 5200.

o       Mike at Master Repair in Ft. Lauderdale, makes a nice box with sides.

 

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How do I set up my batteries for a 24 Volt trolling motor?

 

o       Hobo replies “I drew up this simplified drawing of how you can wire your vessel to allow you to use one of your trolling motor batteries as an alternant general service battery.”

 

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What size battery should I buy for my F150 Yamaha?

 

o       Boatiedawg from the Maverick Boat Company advises “For a 4-Stroke F150-F250, Yamaha recommends a minimum:

            Cold cranking amps 512
      Marine cranking amps 675
      Reserve capacity 182
Also take in consideration for the amps being drawn by your equipment.  You can make a list of your components and their amps and tally them up.  i.e. lights, radios, pumps etc.

o       Do your homework.
      Deka (610) 682-4231                          www.eastpenn-deka.com
      Crown (800) 487-2879                        www.crownbattery.com
      CSI/Dual Pro (800) 742-2740             www.dualpro.com
      LIFEline (626) 969-6886                     www.lifelinebatteries.com
      Interstate-888-772-3600                      www.isba.com
      Optima-888-8OPTIMA                       www.optimabatteries.com
      Rolls batteries (800) 487-0610             www.semarine.com

 

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Should I recharge my trolling motor batteries as soon as I return from fishing?  Or should I wait until just prior to my next trip?

 

o       Both.  It's not good for them to sit discharged.

o       From the Minn Kota Owner’s Manual:  “Maintain batteries at full charge.  Proper care will significantly improve the battery life.  Failure to recharge lead-acid batteries (within 12-24 hours) is the leading cause of premature battery failure.”

 

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What is the proper way to utilize my battery selector switch?  Do you keep it on 1, 2, or both?   Do you change the switch setting throughout the day or alternate which one you use each time out?

 

o       HOBO provides the following very thorough explanation:

A battery selector switch as applied in a bay or flats boat is a VERY useful tool that assures redundancy as well as "peace of mind" for the vessel's owner.

A high quality battery selector switch should have a sufficient capacity power rating to safely handle the 12vdc electrical power required.  This switch MUST also have "bridged" internally sealed contacts allowing it to safely be switched from one battery to both batteries then to the second battery without any interruption of supplied 12vdc power.

The
Blue Sea brand is my favorite based on personal experience.  Quest and Cole Hersee also offer quality selector switches.

In my 24' Pathfinder TE, I use three East Penn series 31, AGM, Dual Purpose batteries, along with a Blue Sea Battery Selector Switch.  Also part of my system includes a three bank Dual Pro PRO charger (15 amps per leg).  This set up utilizes both a 12 vdc system for general cranking and accessory use as well as a 24 vdc system for the 80# Minn Kota trolling motor.  This is a VERY efficient system.  It’s one that uses one of the three batteries that is aligned both in parallel with the #1 Cranking
Battery.  Plus it is connected in series with the third battery to supply 24 vdc trolling motor power.

 

When I am NOT actively using this vessel, the battery selector switch is placed in the OFF position AND the Blue Sea trolling motor circuit-breaker/switch is also placed in the "tripped" or off position.  The trolling motor is left in the un-plugged position.   The only thing that is now capable of operation is the auto-bilge pump when the float switch is activated.

When I get ready to use this vessel, I turn the battery selector switch to either position #1 or position #2.  Either one of these positions is capable of supplying both cranking as well as accessory 12 vdc power as required.  I rotate between battery #1 and battery #2 usually on a "per trip" or daily basis, trying to use each of the batteries as much as the other.

If I know that I am going to be using my trolling motor a lot during a trip then I will select BATTERY #1 to keep from placing any undue drain on the BATTERY #2 which is the "swing" or battery that is used by both the 12 vdc as well as the 24 vdc systems.

With this Blue Sea Battery Selector Switch, it is perfectly okay to switch, on the go, from one battery to the other, just so long as you do not switch through the OFF position.

Your engine will provide charging power to whichever battery(s) the selector switch is assigned.

The ONLY times that I would ever place the battery selector switch in the BOTH position is:
(1) when I know that I am going to be making a relatively long run and want to provide charging current to both batteries #1 & #2 ate the same time.
(2) In the event that I try and crank the engine and the selected battery is so weak that the starter can not turn over the engine AND I then switch to the other battery and also find it to is too weak to start the engine.  Under this condition by placing the selector switch in the BOTH position, you might possibly have enough "juice" in both of them to cumulatively crank the engine.

NEVER switch the battery to the BOTH position when you discover that one battery is "dead".  Doing this will cause the "dead battery" to draw more current from the remaining charged battery than the starter itself would.  Always switch to the opposite battery in the event of a dead battery before switching to BOTH batteries.

If the engine will not start in any of the battery selector switch positions, theN you might want to try the following procedure before calling Sea\\Tow:
(1) Remove the positive engine cable from the COMMON pole on the back of the battery selector switch.
(2)Place it on the positive post of the #3 battery (normally used only for the trolling motor).
(3) Remove the short NEGATIVE cable connecting the negative posts of batteries #1 and #2 together.  Use this cable to connect the negative post of the #3 battery to the vessel's common ground system....

If using this "last chance" method for cranking the engine does indeed work, then immediately head for home.  Do not attempt to re-hook up batteries #1 and #2.

NEVER use "jumper cables" to jump straight from battery #3 to either (or both) batteries #1 and #2.  By attempting this, you will risk immediately "killing" battery #3 because, here again, the dead batteries will pull more current that the engine starter!!!

The 110 vac three bank charger is completely separate from the engine's 12 vdc charging system.  Placing the battery selector switch in any position will not have any effect on this 110 vac charging system.

Keeping the batteries away from the bilge area reduces the probability of battery related problems by 75% or more.  Even with the batteries mounted in the console one should still on a periodic basis remove, clean, then reinstall ALL the battery's terminal connections (at least once a year).

 

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Should I get an on-board or a portable charger?  My knowledge regarding battery chargers is limited.

 

o       An on-board charger is the only way to go.  Give HOBO a shout.  He is a DualPro dealer and should be able to take care of you

o       I am very impressed with a ProTournament charger that I purchased from Odyssey Southeast. As with anything, you get what you pay for.

 

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Should you get a spark when you hook up the wires from the charger to the battery or into the outlet?  Does that mean a bad charger?

 

o       Hamfisted states “If the charger is unplugged from the AC outlet, you should not get a spark.  When you are connecting to the battery, connect the red (positive) side first, then the black (ground) side.  It shouldn't spark that way even if it is plugged in.  Consider installing a DualPro charger and you won’t have to worry about it.

 

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Are there any specs for bilge pump placement?  My 2001 17’ Maverick Master Angler seems to have a float problem.  However, I am unable to locate the pump. 

 

o       Yes.  You have discovered one of the (in my opinion) major design flaws in MHP boats.  You will need a trained spider monkey to replace said pump.  You can change it.  But it won't be a lot of fun.  This is one job to leave to the dealer.

o       My previous 18.5’ Master Angler was also difficult to change out the bilge pump, bait well pump, etc.  If I had kept it, I would have put in a larger rectangular hatch so I could get to the bilge pump, bait well pump, bait well plumbing, etc. more easily.  That is not a real difficult task and is one that I think would be well worthwhile.  Taking it to the dealer is going to cost more than it would cost to put in the larger hatch because they don't have trained monkeys either.  Just people who get billed out by the hour.

o       On my 2001 17’ Master Angler, a bigger access hole would only help marginally unless you have fingers like Arsenio Hall.  The pump is seemingly underneath the bait well instead of being placed more aft.  I'm sure there is a good reason.  But the job still is a tough nut.  I'd be interested to hear what the charge is for replacement.

 

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Why is my bilge pump running so often?

 

o       You probably have a leak.  Put the boat on the trailer and run a hose in the bilge to see where the water runs out.  Check the bottom of the boat while on the trailer for any cracks or holes.

o       Check all hoses and valves to see if there are any loose connections, cracks in hoses, etc.

o       The inspection plate in the splash well often leaks. If you reverse hard or slow down quickly and take water into the splash well this could put a good bit of water into the bilge.

o       Check the scuppers on the side of the console.  Remove the chrome clamshell from the outside.  Sometimes the PVC sleeve that is inside is slightly smaller and needs to be sealed with silicone around it. Upon reinstallation, seal the 3 screw holes that hold the clamshell in place.

o       Another culprit could be the holes in the hull at the trim tabs where all those screws are mounted. Any other hole such as a transom mounted transducer or wires that run from it.

o       On my LT20, the baitwell pump outlet pipe was cracked where the hose going to the livewell was attached with a hose clamp.  I had minimal pressure to the livewell and water was in the bilge constantly.  I just changed out the pump body and had no more problems.  Those pumps are plastic and, I guess after ten years of use, the plastic gets brittle and cracks.

o       Look at all connections where the hose clamps are put on to the livewell pumps.  Sometimes they break when too much pressure is put on them by the clamp.

o       Check all round the pumps themselves.  Sometimes the pump housings will develop a tiny crack and will leak.

o       Check around the tops of your livewells and all the drains.  Sometimes, the sealants will have gone dry.

o       Put a board on top of a floor jack and lift the stern of the boat.  Then check your sea-chest sealant and screws, etc.  Just be sure to properly secure the boat prior to fiddling with it on a trailer.  E.g. blocks for the tires, etc.

 

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How is my automatic bilge pump wired?

 

o                                           HOBO observes the following:  The bilge pump commonly used in Maverick, Hewes, and Pathfinder boats has two modes of operation, manual and automatic.  Each mode has its own wiring circuit complete with its own fuse.  The manual mode fuse is located on the accessory fuse panel underneath the console.  This circuit may be isolated by using the battery selector switch.  The automatic mode is wired directly to the cranking battery and is not controlled by the battery selector switch.  An in-line fuse (or circuit breaker) is usually located within a few feet of the battery.  This set-up is the norm with most modern boat manufacturers.

 

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What is a good boarding ladder setup for my PF 2200V?

 

o       ForgetettoRember offers this setup.  It hooks into two keyhole type mounts. The dealer mounted it so that when you are climbing in the boat, you can grab the leaning post for extra balance.

 

            

 

o       MikeH offers the following design.  I love the fact that it is big enough to comfortably stand and/or sit on.  I have found that I hardly use the ladder myself. It is easy for me to just put my hands on the platform and with a little kick of the feet hoist myself right onto the platform. My kids do the same thing. However, my eight year old sometimes likes to use the ladder. As far as releasing it when deboarding, we usually don't. But you can just depress the red button, which unlocks it from the stowed position, and then just telescope the ladder out.  It was made by Gause Built Boats.

 

                             

 

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company offers and alternative design.  It is popular when wade fishing the flats and you want to get back into the boat.  Note that the ladder does not extend very deep into the water.  Good for the flats but not when you are boarding from a dive site.  Skip notes “I suggest you contact Danny Hubbell in Arnsas Pass, TX at 361-758-3334 as he makes a custom platform for the Pathfinder.  I have one on my boat and it works well. Here at the plant, we use self tapping screws and 5200 to attach them on the port side.”

 

 

o       Tarpon Terry installed a Poly Swim Platform W/O Ladder (West Marine Model Number 384588) and a separate Telescoping 3 Step Swim Ladder (West Marine Model Number 5497045) purchased from West Marine.  Terry wanted a long ladder to better allow divers to get out of the water.  The Telescoping Ladder lies flat on the top of the Swim Platform.  He did have to make a cut out in the Swim Platform in order to allow free movement of the trim tab.

 

        

 

 

o       Dino uses the following Gaerlick Boarding Ladder:

 

      

 

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What is the best way to clean my Boat Cover?

o       You might consider what Sunbrella recommends.

 

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What is a fair price for a T-Top boat cover on a Pathfinder 2200V?

 

o       South Carolina - $1,034

o       Mobile AL - $1,500

o       Largo, FL - $900 for a Pathfinder 2400V

 

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Does anybody know how to tighten a “pull up” cleat?  One of mine is so loose that, in addition to not staying up when pulled up, it vibrates making a very annoying noise at cruising speed.

 

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company reports “The type we use now are not adjustable.  It should be somewhat loose but should stay up when engaged.  While it depends on the location, a flush cleat cannot be changed out without cutting an inspection plate.  We install all the standard cleats before the hull and deck are joined.  Each one is through bolted on the underside of the deck.  These are high quality pieces that with which we really never have any issues.”

o       BOATIEDAWY from the Maverick Boat Company states: “Unfortunately these are all through bolted before decking the boat.  The only cleat you will be able to work on with out cutting access holes is the one on the bow through the anchor locker.  The cleats are set from the vendor and some cannot be adjusted at all.  There are screws in each of the cleat rails which are used for tensioning.  We do tighten these up but most are already as tight as they'll go.  It may be a fact that the plastic around the rails themselves on this particular one was slightly larger than the others.  Try putting a piece of neoprene cut out to fit into the recessed slot to stop the vibrations.”

o       Here is the fix for the "Noisy-Cleat".  Cut off about 1-1/2" of a small cable tie.  Pull the cleat up.  Put some good rubber cement on one of the flat inside posts.  Stick the piece of cable tie on it.  Block up the Cleat to dry.  That’s it.  Works great.  The cleat now even stays up all own its own.

 

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 How can I prevent the accumulation of rust on my boat and its parts?

 

o                   Hamfisted has posted an article from Powerboat Reports on “Corrosion Protection Coating Test.

 

ABSTRACT

How to prevent rust on boats has been one of the sailor’s most enduring challenges.  For this test of anti-corrosion sprays and coatings, anything that had “rust” and any reference to “marine” or “boats” or “salt spray” was fair game.  Paint was out.  Our saltwater test, which involved full immersion of mild steel coupons, was admittedly harsh, and quickly produced results.  After three days, most of the steel coupons were significantly rusty.  Only three saltwater test panels showed no corrosion—those coated with CorrosionPro Lube, CRC Heavy Duty, and LPS 3.

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could have a rustproof boat?  In search of our ideal anti-corrosion coating, we chose the products based largely on their advertised claims and also on how easy they were to find. Among the products we tested for corrosion prevention:  West Marine CorrosionPro Lube, CRC Heavy Duty Corrosion Inhibitor,
Corrosion Block, Boeshield T-9, WD-40, CorrosionX, Corrosion X HD, Shark Hide, LPS 1, LPS 2, LPS 3, and TC-11 all popped up during Internet searches. We left out products that made no specific claims for use in the marine environment.

THE TEST
Each of the test products was applied to two mild steel strips—one to be suspended in salt water and the other to be sprayed with fresh water.  One of mankind’s greatest early achievements was the extraction of pure metal from rock.  The process takes ingenuity and consumes vast amounts of energy.  So it is with considerable frustration that we watch nature so easily reclaim what we have wrought at such cost.  Few are more familiar with corrosion than mariners, who fight a constant battle against it in the salty interface between sea and sky.

A visit to the hardware store or a search on the Internet reveals no shortage of products to address, and even redress, corrosion—most are touted as being able to penetrate ("frees rusted parts"), lubricate, or protect electrical components.  Here we examine the corrosion-inhibiting properties.

What We Tested
We chose the products based largely on their advertised claims and also on how easy they were to find.  Several are available in hardware stores.  West Marine carries its private-label product, CorrosionPro Lube, as well as CRC Heavy Duty Corrosion Inhibitor, Corrosion
Block, Boeshield T-9, and WD-40. CorrosionX, Shark Hide, the LPS products, and TC-11 all popped up during Internet searches. We left out products that made no specific claims for use in the marine environment.  Anything that had "rust" and any reference to "marine" or "boats" or "salt spray" was fair game.

Twelve made the roster: PMS Products’ Boeshield T-9; LPS Laboratories’ LPS 1, LPS 2, and LPS 3; Corrosion Technologies Corp.’s CorrosionX and CorrosionX HD; ICC Industries’ TC-11; Lear Chemical Research Corp.’s Corrosion
Block; West Marine’s CorrosionPro Lube; CRC Heavy Duty; Shark Hide; and WD-40, because it was already in the workshop.

Each showed different degrees of viscosity, all went on wet, and most stayed wet, or at least tacky. 
Those that left a waxy coating, performed the best in the saltwater test.

None is pleasant to use and all of their containers carry stern warnings about flammability, use in poorly ventilated areas, and against inhaling them.  Most use heavier-than-air butane, pentane, or heptane, or a mixture thereof, as propellants, which means there’s a risk of an explosive mixture accumulating in confined spaces, such as bilge compartments.  Ventilate these areas thoroughly before operating anything that might create a spark.

The LPS products use carbon dioxide as propellant, and Corrosion
Block nitrogen, but the solvents are still flammable.

Boeshield T-9
According to its maker, Boeshield T-9 spray is for penetration, moisture displacement, lubrication, and rust and corrosion protection. It’s relatively heavy and dries slightly tacky.  The T-9-coated strip sprayed with fresh water was rust-free after a week. The one submerged in salt water had rust around the screw and at the top after three days. The trend continued through eight days, with more corrosion on the cured side (see sidebar above) than on the uncured side.

Bottom Line: In terms of what our test covered, T-9 works as advertised, even in salt water. Slightly more corrosion at the screw and price edged it out of the top three.

Corrosion
Block
Advertised as a corrosion preventer and inhibitor, Corrosion
Block is a heavy, blue spray that dries thin, clear, and slightly tacky.  After seven days of freshwater dousing, the Corrosion Block coated strip showed some rust spots at the top, where we’d expected a thicker coating. The saltwater strip, however, was very rusty after three days except for an area toward the top. After eight days, it had rust all over it.

Bottom Line: Corrosion
Block is OK for freshwater purposes, but not salt water.  To be fair, the manufacturer makes no claim regarding rust.

CorrosionPro Lube -West Marine
West Marine claims its product offers "...excellent water resistance and superior rust and corrosive preventative characteristics." And it does.  This fine spray leaves a visible, amber-colored, waxy coating. The coating remained intact through a week of freshwater dousing, and the metal strip showed no signs of rust. The saltwater strip saw similar success: The coating remained after three days, and there were no signs of rust. It was only after eight days of saltwater abuse that some rust appeared along the "uncured" edge.

Bottom Line: This product does what it claims. The waxy film isn’t pleasant to the touch, but for hard-to-reach parts, it’s on the money.

CorrosionX
This aerosol, which maker’s claim provides protection against rust and corrosion, initially forms a foamy, blue-green film. The bubbles eventually disappear.  CorrosionX’s freshwater performance was excellent: After seven days, there was no rust and the film was still tacky. (So sticky, in fact, that a few small flies met their end on the metal strip.) Unfortunately, its saltwater efficacy rated at the other end of the spectrum. After eight days, except for a band at the top, the metal strip was very rusty, and particularly corroded around screw.

Bottom Line: CorrosionX works fine in a freshwater environment, but it’s not ready for brine time, especially in a mixed-metal situation.

CorrosionX HD
Think of this as CorrosionX’s big brother: A "high-performance, thick film version of CorrosionX," according to Corrosion Technologies Corp. It comes out as a fine spray with some bubbles and a thick, amber color.

The CorrosionX HD saltwater panel (right), like several other test panels, had more rust on its bottom half than its top half, and oddly, it had less rust on its “uncured” side.  Like its sibling, we rated it Excellent in the freshwater test, but wasn’t up to the challenge of salt water.  The strip in saltwater had a rusty bottom half and a less-rusty top half, almost in proportion to the thickness of its coating.  A clear halo appeared where the product accumulated around the nut, and curiously, less corrosion formed on the "uncured" side.

Bottom Line: The sticky film does resist freshwater penetration, but it isn’t immune to salt water, especially for the long term.

CRC HD Corrosion Inhibitor
CRC Heavy-Duty Corrosion Inhibitor, which is seemingly identical in appearance and performance to CorrosionPro Lube, is made for saltwater use. It claims to protect and preserve metal surfaces subject to salt spray and high humidity. It comes out as a fine spray with a thick coating.  The freshwater test strip still had a sufficient coating and no rust after seven days. It was equally impressive in the saltwater test: coating intact and no rust after eight days.

Bottom Line: Excellent performance. It lives up to its claims. (Bass Pro, Ace Hardware, Boaters World, West Marine...)

LPS 1
LPS Labs offers three products with three levels of rust protection. LPS 1 is marketed as a greaseless lubricant that displaces moisture. Colorless, it has a broad spray range.  In the freshwater test, the LPS 1 panel only had some rust on the uncured side after a week. After three days in salt water, the strip was very rusty, except at the top, and by Day 8, it had rusted all over. The brass screw also showed signs of rust, as though iron were being transported to its surface by galvanic action, there to repeat its demise (just a guess).

Bottom Line: LPS literature says the product displaces moisture on electronic components and that its light, greaseless film inhibits corrosion. It doesn’t claim to prevent rust, but it works for fresh water, if given time to cure. The broad spray pattern made it difficult to concentrate the product where it was wanted.

LPS 2
LPS 2 is touted as a multi-purpose lubricant and penetrant with added corrosion protection.  It’s a colorless, fine spray with a strong almond odor and broad spray pattern.  The freshwater LPS 2 panel had no rust after three days, but some after seven days; more on the "uncured" side. After three days, the saltwater test strip exhibited extensive rusting, and after eight days, it was completely corroded.

Bottom Line: LPS 2 claims to provide protection indoors for a year, and its performance indicates that as its limit. Not useful in salt water.

LPS 3
The strongest of the LPS series, LPS 3 claims to be a long-term, heavy-duty rust inhibitor, even in the harshest environment. Its bubbly, thick spray forms a waxy, pale brown coating.  After a week of freshwater exposure, there was no sign of rust and the coating was still tacky. And even after eight days of saltwater torture, the LPS 3 panel showed no sign of rust and it was still very sticky.

Bottom Line: We tested it under "harsh conditions," and it does what it claims—but it’s not pretty.

Shark Hide
Shark Hide claims to be a protective coating against weathering and salt spray. Marketed mainly to owners of aluminum pontoon boats and similar craft, it lists steel among the surfaces it can be used on.  Unlike the other test products, Shark Hide is a thin, colorless liquid—not an aerosol—that wipes on with soft cloth.  It’s a thin liquid, and has really nasty solvents (toluene and xylene)—so be sure to apply it in the open air and wear gloves.  The freshwater test strip showed rust spots on the "uncured" side after three days. But there was no rust on the cured side, even after a week.  The saltwater panel’s uncured side was rather rusty after three days, but the other side had only mottled rust. Even after eight days, the coupon wasn’t completely rusted.

Bottom Line: Shark’s Hide works well in fresh water when allowed to cure. And it performed better than expected (Fair) in salt water for having such an invisible coating. It’s easy to apply to large, smooth surfaces, less so to small parts like nuts and bolts.

TC-11
TC-11 is the "complete answer for rust control," according to its maker. The bubbly, blue-green spray forms a thick coating that was still sticky after a week of freshwater exposure. It kept the freshwater panel rust-free after seven days.  The saltwater panel did not fare as well: After three days, it had extensive rusting, and after eight days, only the very top was rust-free.

Bottom Line: This product isn’t the silver bullet—but it works in fresh water.

WD-40
Nearly as ubiquitous as duct tape, WD-40 claims to protect against rust and corrosion.  Although the fine, colorless spray’s coating was dry after a week of freshwater sprays, the panel had no rust. However, after three days in salt water, the metal strip was completely rusted, except the top. After eight days, only the very top was showing resistance.

Bottom Line: Works well in fresh water—and makes no greater claims.

CONCLUSIONS
Our saltwater test is admittedly harsh, and quickly produced results. After three days, most of the steel coupons were significantly rusty. Only three saltwater test panels showed no corrosion—those coated with CorrosionPro Lube, CRC Heavy Duty, and LPS-3.  Of the remainder, the Boeshield T-9 panel showed the least corrosion, followed by the cured Shark Hide. (The cured vs. non-cured results support the notion that it pays to follow instructions. Most non-cured sides mimicked the control panel.)  In the freshwater test, the Shark Hide remained rust free. It might be the answer for stainless steel rigging, stern rails, etc., because it leaves no sticky residue—however, it’s an expensive solution.  At 63¢ per ounce, CRC gets the Budget Buy nod. For day-to-day use, loosening sticky mechanical parts, or softening greasy deposits, WD-40 works and is inexpensive.

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How do I install a shoot-through-the-hull transducer?

o       HOBO has the following procedure:

1.       Determine where you will be mounting your transducer. In Pathfinders, I usually mount the shoot-through-the-hull transducers just a few inches to the starboard side of the bilge pump.

2.      Make sure the area to be used is cleaned thoroughly using acetone.

3.      Use a high speed air 3" sanding disc and remove the oyster-white layer of gel coat exposing about a 3 to 4 inch circle of raw glass. However, this is really not a necessity.  Just roughing up the area with sandpaper will work.

4.      Using some 5-minute, 2-part epoxy glue a two inch long section of 4" PVC pipe down to the prepared area. This creates a "pool" in which the transducer will be mounted.

5.      Using some rather rough (50-80 grit) sand-paper, rough up the bottom surface and all sides of the transducer.

6.      Mix up about a half-pint of regular fiberglass resin with the appropriate amount of the MEK hardener.  You can readily purchase this resin/hardener in quart containers from Boater's World, West Marine, etc.

7.      Pour about half of the mixed resin directly into the 4" PVC pipe glued to the floor.  Next dip the transducer into the remaining resin wetting the bottom and all sides thoroughly.  Place the wetted transducer into the pool of resin.  It is more dense than the resin therefore it will not float but will sink to the bottom.  Pour the remaining resin onto the upper part of the transducer.

8.      Using scissors, cut up into small pieces of fiberglass cloth and sprinkle on to the top of the still liquid glass.  This strengthens the glass and prevents it from forming cracks when it hardens.

9.      When the Resin sets up, the transducer will actually become part of the hull.  Any bubbles held in suspension and formed when mixing or pouring this resin will easily float to the top and disappear.  The disadvantage of using Marine-Tex or two-part epoxies is that they are much thicker and denser.  Thus, you run the risk of a bubble of air being captured between the transducer and the floor thereby distorting the sonar signal which results in inaccurate readings.

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Where are some good places to Bonefish in the Bahamas?

o                   Rdfish1 mentions that a couple of folks have suggested Pat Roberts at Sandy Point and staying at Pete/Gays guesthouse.  But I don't know if that's because the fishing and accommodations are great or because it's more convenient for commercial flights into Marsh Harbor.

o                   Skip from the Maverick Boat Company suggests Andros would be a better choice than Marsh Harbor although you have more accommodation choices in Marsh Harbor.  There is a flight everyday out of Lauderdale to Andros and there are quite a few lodges from which to choose.  I have been to a few.  Take a look at Stafford Creek Lodge owned and run by Prescott Smith.  Another place you might want to check out is Deep Water Cay on Grand Bahama. It's easy to get there.  Fishing is good. You can have great at times as long as you tell the guide that you do not want to fish schooling fish and it's a decent place to stay.  Nothing fancy.  The food is decent and they have nice decent equipment.

o                   BONES13 advises that you can't go wrong with the Abaco's and then once there, you can always take the ferry across to Green Turtle where I know there is a charter captain that runs an older Hewes.  If you're looking for big bones, stick to Biscayne Bay and or the Keys.  The Bahamas has an abundance of bonefish, but nowhere near as big as we do here.

o                   Corey notes that I have fished Andros seven or eight times over the past dozen years, always at Andros Island Bonefish Club.  Andros has variety within the bonefish category. Tell your guide you want to catch fish, and he'll make sure you do, though they might be small.  Tell him you want to catch big fish, and he'll show you some.  Catching them is up to you.  Andros offers good ocean-side wading if that's what you like, and a huge variety of reasonably protected lagoons, lakes, sloughs and what have you back in the bites.  If your primary interest is bone fishing and you're not interested in nightlife, Andros Island Bonefish Club is a good choice.  The accommodations are adequate.  The food is pretty good.  The atmosphere is very relaxed.  You can book your stay through many of the fishing outfitters, but lately we've been simply booking directly.  If you decide to do that, just call Juliet Newbold at the Club at (242) 368-5167.  There are a number of other lodges on Andros, too.  And of course, there's good fishing on many of the other islands.  A little research on the Internet will provide you with a lot of information.  Continental Airlines now has direct flights from FLL to Andros Town/Fresh Creek on the north part of the island.  You can also get to the island, and other airports further south, on Bahamasair and some other scheduled carriers out of Nassau, and of course, you can charter.  We used to charter with an outfit that serves one of the dive resorts, but the last time we did, the pilot, Alex Blackwell, decided at the last minute that he wasn't going to fly us back to the states.  We were lucky there were seats on the Continental flight.  We'll be taking Continental again next month.

o                   Larry Albright states you can't go wrong with Patrick at Sandy Point.  Pete and Gay is comfortable with way too much food.  Lots of varied fishing.  We've been going there for 13 years. You'll also find the cost more reasonable than Andros.  Especially at Prescott's place.

o                   Conocean mentions in my opinion, you can toss a coin for Andros versus Marsh Harbor.  I'm in Marsh Harbor 2-3 times a year for business.  Most of the fish you'll find in both areas are small to medium size.  The bigger ones are smart!  You also might want to consider Harbour Island in Eleuthera.  It tends to have less charter traffic than most islands and there are plenty of nice places to stay.  9lb+ bonefish are very abundant.  I fish with Captain Patrick Roberts over there (242.333.3014) but Bonefish Jermaine (242.333.3205) is good too!  I'm actually fishing two days with Patrick next month.  He's one of the few guides in the islands that enjoys fishing for 12 hours straight!!

o                   Osseous advises that Larry's post above is right on the money.  I may be biased as I introduced Larry and his wife to Sandy Point all those years ago, coaxing him away from AIBC.  I've been to many lodges throughout the Bahamas so I think I can give you some further guidelines that may be helpful.  Andros and Grand Bahama are going to have the very largest bones in the Bahamas.  You will find some 10 lb plus fish there.  Sandy Point itself (not the same thing as Marsh Harbor AT ALL!) holds some very large fish on the town flats.  The run to Mores Island is an easy one in Patrick's 20' Action Craft.  Now you're in the land of the giants!  I saw the largest Bone of my life there.  Ricardo, owner of Rickmon Lodge in Sandy Point and Patrick's cousin, estimated it at 17 or 18 lb.  The man knows his bonefish!  A good day at Mores should bring an 8 lb fish.  Larry's gotten several that size over the years and larger.  I landed one last year that weighed 8 lbs on the Boca, and another on the same day that a shark sliced in two was 7 even with a giant hole in its belly. I had bigger fish there take me over the edge of a channel and cut me off on the coral.  The sheer number of fish at Sandy Point is good, and the opportunity for large bones is unavoidable.  The lodging is "Keysie", but clean and quite comfortable.  They go out of their way to look after you, but on occasion, it helps to make your wishes known, rather than stewing over something that you might consider obvious.  It's just a culture thing. Believe me, they want you to enjoy yourself and to return again and again.  As you head south from Andros to Exuma, Eleuthera, Long Island, Crooked, Acklins and then on down the chain, including the islands of the Turks and Caicos, you're usually going to find more fish, but they're smaller on average.  They're not always pushovers, mind you, but they definitely decline in average size as you get south of Andros and Sandy Point.  The Permit on the other hand....

 

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What is the make and model of the toggle switch for my bilge pump and where can I find it?  I have no power going to my bilge pump and/or courtesy lights via my toggle switch.  I know the pump works, because I can manually turn on the bilge pump via the float switch. 

 

o       The pump’s power comes directly from the battery and has a separate fuse. Check the fuse that supplies your toggle switch.

o       To rule out the toggle switch, swap it out with another one from your panel.

o       Check with Ken at Flounder Pounder Marine in Cape Canaveral. The website is http://www.fpmarine.com/   He carries a lot of M/H/P products.

 

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Where do the wires attached to the ACC switches lead?  All of the terminals on my electrical panel rocker switches already have wires attached to them (even the unused ACC switches.

 

o       BOATIEDAWG from the Maverick Boat Company states “Here is a run down on your ACC switches and the color of the wires. Again, this is for just your ACC wires.
      LW 1 ACC  (red/white) is for #1 LW Recirc pump
      LW 2 ACC  (red/yellow) is for #2 LW Recirc pump
      Bilge ACC  (brn/grn) is for a Salt water wash down
      ACC/ACC  (brn/blk) is for Fresh water wash down
                     (blu/wht) is for LW lights
      Horn ACC  (blu/red) is for Courtesy lights

 

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How do I add Courtesy Lights to my 2001 2200V?

 

o       HOBO offers the following advice.

 

It’s a really simple job.

The back of all the "lighted single pole, double throw, ON-OFF-ON rocker switches are already wired "hot" to the accessory fuse panel.  This translates to:

  1. A black wire (ground wire for the light inside the switch) will be attached to a single pole on the left-top of the back side of the switch.
  2. A colored wire is leading from a fused terminal of the accessory fuse panel with the other end connected to the center pole on the back of the switch.  This makes the switch "hot" and ready to connect to an accessory item.
  3. The terminal poles above and below this center pole may or may not have wires attached.  If no wires are attached to either the pole above or below this center pole then you may attach the positive lead from your courtesy sights to either one of these poles.
  4. The black wires from your courtesy lights must be connected to a negative terminal on the fused panel, battery, etc.

    NOTE: LED lights are polarity sensitive and MUST be wired positive to positive and negative to negative.

    If both the upper and lower poles of the rocker switch already have wires attached, then turn the switch "On" in both directions and see if anything in your boat "turns on" or begins to operate.  If nothing "turns on", then remove the wire from the corresponding terminal on the back of the switch and attach your courtesy light’s positive leads.  NOTE: When you push on the upper switch position on these rocker switches the BOTTOM terminal pole on the back of the switch is being energized.  Push on the lower switch position and the TOP terminal pole on the back of the switch is being energized.

 

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How do you add additional pumps to the switch panel?

 

o       HOBO replies “All the M/H/P boats come with their switch-panels pre-wired.  The rocker-switches themselves are wired to be "hot", regardless if anything is hooked up to the "down-stream" side of the switch or not.  This means that if you want to hook up a second live well, horn, whistle, light, radio, or anything else that is 12vdc, all you have to do is connect the positive wire from that appliance to one of the outer empty spade lugs on the back of the rocker-switch and connect the appliance's black wire to any negative ground source.  You will then be in business.  You will, of course, have to install the correct size fuse.

 

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Are there any pictures or is there a chart showing what fuse runs which circuit?

 

o       Boatiedawg from the Maverick Boat Company advises, “These are our color combinations and should be the same for earlier models. When you trace these to the proper device, leave it running and pull the fuse to see if it cuts off.  Then you are sure of the connection.”

brown - bilge
brown/white - LW 1
Brown/orange - LW2
brown/blue - if there is an accessory
gray - stern light or running lights
gray/white - running lights or stern
blue/black - courtesy lights

 

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How do I feed a new wire from the console to the bilge?  There is no string available.

 

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company suggests, “If available, use a plumbers snake and grease it well. As you have found, it's a tight squeeze.  You will see where the console wire bundle goes into the tube.  The tube is a piece of PVC that is built into the top portion of the stringer.

o       Hamfisted advises, “I always have better luck going from the bilge end toward the console, rather than starting at the console end.  I use a round nylon fish tape from Home Depot.  Spray silicone on it if it seems to get stuck.  But it will usually slide right through.

o       Try some dish soap.  Hopefully, it is just hitting a small obstruction.  For the worst-case scenario, if absolutely nothing else works, pick a wire, preferably the ground from the battery to accessory fuse tray.  Cut it and tie on a string and then pull it through.  You will need to run a new ground wire to replace the one you just cut.  Finally, be sure to leave 2 pull strings in the rigging tube.  Tie the ends off to something secure at each exit.

 

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Is there a color code standard for wiring in marine electrical applications?

 

o       Apparently not, but here is a link to a Boston Whaler web site that shows their wiring standards as well as standards for Evinrude, Johnson, Mercury, Mariner, Yamaha and Honda.  Marine Wiring Codes

 

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What are the Pros and Cons of using Ethanol fuel in marine motors?

 

o       It takes more ethanol to produce the same amount of energy as gasoline. If using straight ethanol as opposed to straight gasoline to get the same energy you have to burn more volume.  On alcohol fueled cars (racing) they dump more fuel into the engine to get the same horsepower.  Ethanol is not better or cheaper.  It's just something that is available and burns cleaner.  Ethanol has many disadvantages over gas as a fuel.

o       Since ethanol has only 2/3 the energy content of gasoline, you should only see about a 3% reduction in MPG (1/3 times 10% ) using E10.  Brazil burns more ethanol than gasoline.  They make it from sugar cane which, is more efficient than making it from corn.  Right now, the USA should be planting sugar cane on every unused square foot of ground on the Gulf Coast.  But, of course, politics are in play with the corn lobby being very strong in this country.

o       The introduction of ethanol has nothing to do with delivering a more economical fuel source.  Producing ethanol is more expensive than producing raw gasoline.

o       Ethanol is an oxygenate.  It is the current "go-to" replacement for MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether), also an oxygenate.  Unfortunately, MTBE is not environmentally friendly.  It is not bio-degradable.  On several occasions, it has leaked out of underground tanks and contaminated water supplies.  Ethanol blended fuel was never intended to be cheaper or better performing than MTBE blended fuel. But the refiners had to go to another oxygenate.  There are others, but ethanol is the choice right now.  Bio-butanol is a much better choice, but it is not readily available).

o       Ethanol is a good oxygenate and octane booster - but is has several bad points. Take a look at this link from Boat US called “A Corny Solution”.

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company states “We received this Bulletin from Yamaha regarding Ethanol.

o       A Corporate Chevron Rep told me that, at this time, there are no plans to introduce Ethanol to their gasoline in Florida at this time.  If you’re worried about using it in your motors, then use Chevron for now

o       They sell it in Harris County (Houston, TX) and the surrounding adjoining counties.  But we don't have it in my home town of Brenham, TX.

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How do I make a marker to mark my fishing spots?

 

o       Hobo offers the following:

      I have found the best "Spot Marker" to be a Gator-Aid or Power-Aid bottle.  The reason for the Gator-Aid or Power-Aid plastic bottles is two-fold.  First off, they both have a groove around the bottle making it easy to roll-up and store line.  Second, they make one size that is right at three inches in diameter. This is the one you want because it makes it easy to keep up with how much line you have attached.  Every five (5) wraps of line equals about four (4) feet.  If I am fishing a wreck that is 12 feet deep I will put about 17 wraps (about 14 feet) of 10-15 pound test mono along with a 12-16 oz bank sinker and I am in business.  This rig costs almost nothing.  It takes up little space, is made very quickly and it is expendable.  If you lose it you haven't lost very much.  Also, by using the smaller pound-test mono (which I purchase in 1/4# spools from Wal-Mart for $0.99) if a fish wraps the buoy-line most often you will lose the buoy and not the fish.

 

I always keep Gator Aid on board.  A 1/4# spool of 10-15# test line is stored in my leaning post, a half-dozen or so 12-16 oz bank-sinkers are always kept in my tackle supply box under the console.

I usually keep 2-3 of these marker buoys already made up with varying lengths and ready to deploy with only the need to attach the weight.  I tie a large loop in the "sinker-end" of the 10-15# mono,  To the end of this loop, I tie a large 1/4" x 3 rubber band with a half hitch.  This rubber band is used to pull over and secure the line to the bottle once it is rolled up onto the groove.  This same rubber band can be used to attach the weight when the bottle is going to be used or the weight can be attached directly to the 10-15# line.  Either way, a half-hitch is used for easy disassembly.  I only wrap enough line as needed for whichever wreck I am fishing depending upon the depth.

About 50% of the time, you can figure to lose the weight to the wreck upon retrieval.   No big deal.  Just roll up what's left.  Put a large loop knot (about a foot in diameter) in the end.  Install a rubber-band and secure the line into the bottle groove.  Throw it into the leaning post storage box and don't worry about it until the next trip.

You can easily rig one of these "semi-expendable" marker buoys in about two minutes at almost "zero" cost except for the bank-sinker.

Years ago, I used to use the big long-line type floats and would wrap a 100 feet or so of 1/4" nylon cord attached to a 3-5 pound window-weight.  Two to three of these took up a lot of room in the boat, cost a lot more, and were too easy to spot by passing boats.  So I went with something smaller, cheaper and would mark a wreck just as good.  Plus it was disguised as a piece of trash from someone's boat.

 

o       These Buoy Markers work well also.  Only the amount needed to get the weight to the bottom comes off of the block.  You do run the risk of losing the weight to rocks or wreck debris.

 

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Is there a good landing net that will fit on my flats boat?  I don’t have much space for a big one.

 

o                   Doc Holiday recommends:

I found out quickly that there is no room on a flats boat for a normal landing net. I never liked where it was since it was always in the way and caught on hooks and people.  I found a fold up net that works great and stores under the gunnels or in rod holders.  It is called the Hibernet #52 and it works awesome.  It’s made out of aluminum on the handle and there is nothing to rust.  The net is big and strong and allows you to dip any big Snook etc.  The best part is having it stowed away until you need it and it slides open quickly and easily.

 

         

 

 

o                   I got mine at my local tackle shop for $69.99.  Here is a place on line.  http://www.anglersarsenal.com/productCat57532.ctlg

o                   Here is the company site: http://jebran.com/

o                   Bass Pro Shops has it at http://www.basspro.com/servlet/catalog.T...t=SearchResults

o                   I've had one for at least 2 or 3 years. Still works great.  The only problems I had are:
1)" Occasionally" the net doesn't fold the way it's supposed to, but only when putting it away, never when you are in a hurry opening it.  It only takes a few seconds to fix it and stow it away.
2) At the base, where the net opens, there are 2 small prongs that bring the net together to fold it and holds it in place when opened.  Once, one of them came out of it's hole.  Later I was able to fix it with just a couple of blows of a hammer and it never happened again.
3) It may be difficult to open by a woman or a child since it takes some strength to push the net out and back inside the handle.  Patty opens it fine, but I may have to listen to her use some 4 lettered words in the process, since it's always in a hurry that you need it.
4) 99 % of the time it is just fine but for the occasionally larger fish but it isn't as big and deep as I would like it.

I'm really being "very picky" with these negative comments but am just passing on the experience.  The positives outweigh this list above by a ton and if I ever lose it or gets lost ( because it won't break unless I try to fit in a 4 feet tarpon or shark) I would get another one!!!  It's very light, never rusts, sturdy.  It stows neatly behind my legs under the seat (not inside) kept in place with a couple of rubber holders.  Even the netting has been resistant to my abuse and treble hooks.

 

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What is the best way to remove a hook imbedded in my skin?

o       This is a link to how to remove an embedded hook.  Hook Removal Procedure

o       Here is a link that includes the snatch method along with some alternative methods.  Hook Removal Methods  The "snatch" method works incredible well, I've had to use it twice on myself with fairly deeply embedded treble hooks.  Most recently last week, when I had one treble hook in my hand the other side of the plug hooked to a thrashing ladyfish!  One thing I've learned from this latest experience is the need to start carrying a pair of side cutters on the boat. Being able to cut the hook away from a plug quickly or removing the other barbs of a treble hook would be real nice.  Both times I've had to do this I've thought "Man, there's just NO WAY this is going to work without yanking out a chunk of flesh" yet it works slick as you please with minimal wounding and pain.

o       The snatch method really works well.  I've used it on a friend who had one treble hook in a redfish and the other in his hand.  The side cutters quickly separated the two, then the snatch method removed the hook from my friend.  At least it did on the second attempt.  That was the time I learned how important it is to hold the hook shank down with one hand while jerking with the other to keep the hook coming straight out.  I didn't do it right the first time, and it took us each three beers to get our courage up to try it again.  Shortly after that lesson, I had the opportunity to remove one from my wife's hand.  This time it went perfectly.  I just cut a piece off the butt section of a leader, told TJ to look the other way, held the hook shank with one hand and popped the fly out with the other.  By the way, we mash down the barbs on all our hooks, even the treble hooks on lures.  It makes extraction from human body parts even easier that way and doesn't seem to result in a lot of lost fish.  I encourage everyone to become familiar with the technique. It's easy and it can save a fishing day.

o       I've heard that this technique will not work with circle hooks though. I think it was Rick Murphy who gave the following advice.  If you do get stuck past the barb with a circle hook, you have two choices.  One, push it through and cut the hook, or two, pull up your pantyhose and go to the ER.

o       That technique works so well, it's hard to believe. I've used it a number of times.  Once, on myself, with a 1/0 fly hook, but haven't yet needed to go after a treble hook.  In anticipation of when the treble hook need might arise, I carry some heavy diagonal cutting pliers on my boat to cut off the other two hook points before "snatching" out the buried point.  With luck, the need will never arise.

 

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What boats/trailers are able to be stored in the garage?

o       Skiffin16 has a Hewes 17’-2” Tailfisher on an Ameratrail Trailer with a Yamaha T60 motor.  Using no swing/removable tongue, he is able to store it in a 20’ deep garage.  The total length of the boat, motor and trailer is 20’-11”.  He stores it at a slight angle with the tongue tucked into the corner.

o       TimD states that his Maverick Mirage 16’-9” HPX V on a Float On trailer with a swing away tongue and a Yamaha 90 motor will fit in his 19’-10” garage with 10” to spare.

o       Poleposition advises that his Maverick 18’6” Master Angler on an Ameratrail ZT trailer with a Yamaha F150 motor fits straight in with the motor hard to port in his garage measuring 20’-3”.  He states he has about and inch to spare.  The following is a picture of his swing tongue.

 

 

o       Bay-wolf notes that he has a PF 2000 that just fits in a 22'6" garage. It sits on an Ameratrail trailer with a swing tongue.  Total length with the tongue swung is 22'3".  It is tight.  It couldn't have planned any better.

o                   Pointman has a  2007 Maverick HPX-V, Yamaha F90, factory poling platform, sitting on an Ameratrail trailer with Goodyear 205R75 x 14 tires on alloy wheels equipped with a Zero Tolerance fold-back trailer tongue. His garage depth: 21’-2”.  The overall boat length including the bow mounted trolling motor with the trailer tongue folded back is 20'-2".  The motor is trimmed slightly up.  It could be shorter if trimmed straight down. The part of the package that protrudes closest to the front door is the trolling motor prop.  From the floor of the garage to the top of the poling platform is 76.5”.  It clears the upper limits of the garage/door by about one inch.  If he doesn’t fold down the anchor light, it will break when backing into the garage.  He just finished replacing one today.  The Zero Tolerance trailer makes it possible to keep the boat in the garage instead of under a cover on an open storage lot.  It's easily the best trailer he has ever owned.

o                   Dphorvath reports that his 2005 16’ Redfisher with a F-90 Yamaha on a trailer with a removable tongue has a total length of 18’-8” including a trolling motor overhang of about 4”.  The rig fits straight in his garage with a depth of 18’-10”.  He also has a hinged poling platform that folds down.  The garage door height is 7’-1” with the platform (extended) rising to 7’-2” not including the pole cat push pole holder.  He advises that everything works great provided that he remembers to fold the platform down when pulling her out of the garage at 4am.

o       DonE offers the following advice:

When some of you noticed the tight fit of my boat in the garage, I thought I would share the full view with you.  The boat would fit in the garage on an angle with no problem but the car had to stay outside.  With the hurricanes two years ago, we were lucky with no direct hit but we got lots of wind and debris flying around and I wanted to put both my boat and car in the garage.  I was told by numerous shops and my salesmen that Magic Tilt did not make a hingeable tongue for my trailer. I finally emailed Magic Tilt on a Friday night in September and on Monday I had an answer with part numbers and availability all thanks to Louis Schafer at Magic Tilt.  Within a week, I had the hingeable tongue installed and then Hurricane Jeanne passed by real close the next day!

For the measurements, the garage is 20 x 19 and I needed the following to get the boat (16.5 Hewes Redfisher) in the garage.
18 feet for the boat and motor
18 feet 8 inches for the boat, motor and hingeable tongue
19 feet clearance for the door.

So I had four inches to spare!!  I back the boat into the garage about two thirds of the way, put the motor full down and then manually position it to markers placed on the floor.  I also have a work bench and my kayak in the garage and have about 12 inches on the side to get in and out near the kayak.  I almost never hit my shins on the trailer fenders as I carry stuff into the house.  For the car, of course any passengers have to exit before I pull in, and sometimes when I am in a hurry, it is a squeeze to get out of the car. One more reason to watch my weight!

I really enjoy having the boat with me. As you guys post items on the forum many times I just go downstairs and compare and see if mine works the same way.  Here is a picture.

 

 

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Why does the fuel gauge on my 2005 F115 RF16 only show the bottom LED flashing even after a fill up?  I have checked the dip switches on the gauge and they all appear correct according to the manual. What do I start checking next?

 

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company states “I would first check your ground wire on the tank.  Go through the console inspection plate.  You should see a pink wire attached to the tank.”

o       Hamfisted states “When you find that pink wire on the sending unit, short it out with the ground wire.  With the key ON, check to see if the gauge shows FULL.  If it does, then your sending unit in the tank is bad.  Also, just check for obvious corrosion on the contacts.  If there, clean it off.  If you need a new sending unit. I would recommend the Centroid electronic units which you can buy on line.

 

                       

 

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How do I install a new set of Yamaha Digital Multifunction gauges?

 

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company states “We get quite a few questions regarding the installations of the Yamaha Gauges.  Thanks to Mike here you go.”
      Yamaha Multi Function Gauge
      Yamaha Multi Function Gauge Kit Installation

 

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Where do I purchase the correct color of Gelcoat for my hull?

 

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company states “You can purchase gelcoat here; www.minicraft.com.

 

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Why does my GPS blink off sometimes when starting up the motor?  It doesn’t do it every time though.

 

o       HOBO states “This is because of voltage drop when the starter in engaged.  It could be caused by several factors including but not limited to (1) Battery not being fully charged, (2) poor contact at the terminal connections of the GPS unit, (3) the accessory fuse panel 12VDC supply wire (cable) being too small.  I like to use 8-gauge wire for this feed.”

 

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Why does my 1996 18’ Redfisher with a 130 HP seem like its squatting too much?  Is it normal on these boats?

 

o       It’s designed that way.  The front V of my boat hits bottom before I start dragging the rear around when I’m fishing skinny and I have the 150 HPDI.  It’s the heaviest you can put on the 18’ Redfisher.

o       Having a couple of big batteries in the aft storage compartment, a full live well, and a tackle box under the driver's seat will contribute to squat.

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company states “It’s a bit out of my realm, but the Maverick and Hewes hulls are quite different.  The Hewes hull is "sleeker" and, on average, faster.  It does not have as sharp an entry as the Maverick hull.  The pad is also different which would help contribute to the squat.  It’s more like a bass boat built for speed.

 

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Will a hydrofoil on the motor help lift the back end out of the water, decreasing drag and thus increasing top end?  I have a 1997 19' Redfisher Tunnel Drive with a 2002 Suzuki 140 four stroke 4 blade SS.  Top end at 6000 RPM is 33-34 MPH.  I have been told on many occasions that it is just the nature of the beast.  I know with any tunnel hull there is a significant trade off between top end and running skinny water.  While I do not expect to hit 50 MPH, if I could get to 40 MPH I would be pretty pleased.

 

o       Here in Texas, many boats run cavitation plates, which are a bit larger than a hydrofoil.  Boatright, Fibertex and Shallowblaster are the most popular.  Most of the benefits are supposed to be a better hole shot.  The advertised gain is 1-2 MPH or so for a hydrofoil and a 1-2 MPH drop for a cavitation plate.  I doubt that a hydrofoil will give you 5-7 MPH.

o       I have a 96 tunnel with a 115 2 stroke. My maximum top end with a 15 pitch, Power Tech 4 blade is also 33-34 MPH on the GPS.  I am surprised that with the 140 you are only getting the same MPH that I get.  It makes me feel a little better about my maximum speed.

o       Those numbers sound consistent with my '96 tunnel with a 140 Suzuki four stroke. They are just slow boats.

 

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Have there been any design changes to the 18’ Redfisher hull from 1995-1999?

 

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company states “Nope”

 

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When did the factory quit using wood in construction of boats?  I’m looking at a used Hewes boat for purchase. 

 

o       Skip from Maverick Boat Company, states “No wood is used in any of our products since 1989”.

 

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What is the difference between the 17’ Maverick Master Angler and the 18’ Redfisher?

 

o       The Maverick Series more of a cutting edge on the bow, a little higher quality finish in some respects, and are a good all around boat.  The Redfisher series is the "basic" flats boat that gets the job done and has been a workhorse of many a guide in south Florida throughout the early 90's.  Rick Murphy owned one for years, as did a few other top guides.

o       Both are great boats.  The Redfisher is obviously bigger and will handle more

      horse power.  I also believe the Redfisher's are in general a faster hull (certainly on the more recent models). The 17’ Master Angler does have the sharper entry and for a 17, rides and fishes like a much bigger boat.  A nice thing on the 17’ Master Angler is it will run nicely on smaller HP.

o       I like the 17 MA better, because of the storage, ride, and fuel economy with the small motor.

 

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What is the difference between the Tailfisher versus the Redfisher 16’.

 

o       The Redfisher will ride better in a chop but the Tailfisher will run in spit.

o       The Tailfisher rides great for a flat bottom skiff.  You can make it ride better by adjusting the tabs and trim based on the conditions.

o       The Tailfisher is an awesome shallow water boat.  I you drive it right, it can handle some pretty good chop.  Plus there’s no contest when it comes to a depth comparison.

o       My Redfisher is very stable.  I am a big guy and I can walk the gunnels without fear.  Not tippy at all.

o       Regarding my Redfisher, as far as power goes, I went with the most power and least weight I could get which is the 70 2 stroke.  There is a considerable difference in performance between the 4 stroke 60 and the 2 stroke 70.  From my experiences, the 60 will top out around 30-31 and I top out at 38.  These numbers are side by side tests with a friend that has the 4 stroke 60.  The other big difference is hole shot.  With the 2 stroke 70, I have almost zero bow lift at take off with the tabs neutral, and it planes much faster than the 4 stroke.  The 4 stroke 60 has some advantages in the fuel consumption department and also offers the ability to flush without having to run the motor.  The downside is the maintenance of all the oil changes etc.  Not too expensive if you can perform all of your own work, but real expensive if you have to take it to the dealer.  The schedule my friend told me was 25, 50, and 100 hrs to service the 4 stroke then after every 100 hrs of service.  Those cost him an average of $ 300.00 dollars each.  So far I have 52 hrs on mine and I have changed plugs once @ $ 2.34 ea. from AutoZone. Lower gear case oil 3 times @ $ 7.00 ea. I re-torqued all required bolts to spec at 25 and 50 hrs.  Total cost including BEER is under $ 50.00.

 

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I’d like to know how the 18’ Redfisher performs.  How does it ride?  Is it poleable?  What are some specs with a 150 V MAX and F150? What is the price range?

 

o       In short, it’s a great boat.  I don’t know what kind of fishing you are planning but I love mine.  I don’t pole it because I can’t get any shallower than I can go with the trolling motor.  The draft is 11”.  I have the 150 V MAX HPDI.  Top speed fully loaded, 2 people, trolling motor, power pole, jack plate, full tank is about 55 MPH with 3 blade, 21 pitch prop.  It gets on a plane in a boat length.  Gas mileage is over 5 MPG at 40 PH.  I’m running about the same RPMs as speed.  It handles a 20-25 knot chop nicely on the flats with proper use of trim tabs.  Sometimes with that kind of chop, or more, you may need to cheat the waves by cutting into or against them (doing a zig zag to destination).  It has a very dry ride.  The V MAX HPDI gets identical gas mileage as the 4 stroke at mid range speeds and better gas mileage than the 4 stroke at high speeds.

o       I couldn't be more pleased with the F150 package. I get 55 MPH, loaded to fish with 2 people.

 

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What is the best power for the 18’ Redfisher?

 

o       Always go to the max with horse power is my motto!

o       Max HP is always better unless the added weight will increase the draft too much for your style of fishing.

o       It does a good job with the F115.  If you find a great deal on a F115 you'll have a nice boat.  If you find a F150 at the same price you have an even a better deal.  If you are building, I'd go with the F150.

o       I like the 150.  A friend of mine and I both have 18's.  I'm glad I have a 150 HPDI and he wishes he hadn't bought the F115.  He has to run that little sewing machine WFO to follow me anywhere when I'm turning 4200-4400 RPMs.  It annoys both of us.  He also had to get a negative wedge to make it get up on a plane in what either one of us considers to be a respectable distance.  The old two-stroke 115 had much more guts than the 4-stroke and was better suited for the RF18.  It is sufficient to push the boat, but not a F115 AND that much weight in the stern.

o       I have a F115 on a RF-18 and would buy the exact same set up again.  I don't have a jack plate.  I run a PowerTech 17" 4 blade.  The hole shot rivals a 2 stk.  It handles like a Ferrari in corners.  Top end is only 43-44 mph, but I don't have big runs here in SC where I need to cover lots of territory fast.  Fuel consumption isn't an issue.  It may save me an inch or so when poling or running the trolling motor, but who's counting?  It's a fantastic boat, and I love mine with the F115.

o       I have the 150 HPDI which is heavier than the F150.  The nose of my boat hits bottom first when I’m on the flats,and trust me, I’m on the flats all day long. The 150 HPDI gets better gas mileage than the F150 at mid range speeds and MUCH better at high speeds.  The hole shot is not even close.  Running the 150 HPDI at 4000 rpm’s to go 40 mph running beside the F115 at 5000rpms to go 40 mph.  The 150 HPDI will get much better gas mileage.

o       The HPDI is half as loud as the regular 2 strokes.  I don’t know what issues others have had with it sitting too long.  I personally don’t like the 4 stroke because, for the weight, I would rather have the torque of the 2 stroke.  Plus the HPDI's get great gas mileage.  Now, MHP does not offer the HPDI on the 18 RF anymore, so it would have to be ordered separately and it's much more expensive.  I ordered my boat without the motor and put the HPDI on at the dealer.  If the HPDI is not an option, go with the extra horses (F150) the same thing applies.  It does not affect the draft and you can run lower RPM’s, get higher speeds and get great gas mileage.  I highly recommend putting the 5 degree negative wedge on if you are going with a heavy engine like the F150.  It gives you more negative tilt with which to get on a plane which you will need if you are fishing shallow.  You will always have enough positive tilt.  It’s about a $45.00 item that the dealer can put on for about $45.00 labor.  With trim tabs and tilt down, I can get on plane in a boat length.  I also have the jack plate which to me is priceless. I can put the jack plate all the way up, the engine all the way down, trim tabs all the way down and pop up in 15" of water in a boat length.  These ingredients, 150 horses, jack plate, 5 degree negative wedge, and trim tabs make for one bad arse "fishing machine" on the flats.

o       It seems like your pretty set on the F150, but my friend has the F115 and I think it’s perfect if you are not a speed demon.  He gets a top end of 45 mph with good fuel economy.  It also sits heavy in the back with the wells filled.

o       I doesn't matter which engine you put on the back of the RF.  They all "squat."  That is part of the design.  This hull was built more for speed. I've seen posts of RF18's with F115's, F150's & 150 VMAX's with & w/o JP's.  They all squat!

o       I’ve got the F115 and it does great for the way I fish.  It has great fuel economy and hole shot isn’t bad.  I get 46 mph WOT with a 3 blade stiletto.  Great fuel economy.  The best way to figure out which motor you want is to analyze how long your runs will be, what type of water you fish, and how fast you want to run.  Either way you go, I’m sure you will be more than happy with your boat/engine choice.

o       F150! You can putter around the flats at 4.5gph/30mph and fish all day on 5 gallons.  But, when you're ready to make a long run or NEED to pass someone in a canal you can nail it and scream along at 55-56mph.

o       I see between 4.6-5.0 mpg over the course of a day with the 150 HPDI, usually running long distances at 4500-4700 rpms or so and 45-48 mph. I've found that my mpg varies greatly depending on how choppy it is and how much I can trim out.  If there's a slight ripple allowing me to get some air under the hull and I can trim it out, I can see above 5 mpg.  It all depends on the chop.  I'm running a 20-pitch prop, a bit less than what Yamaha calls for.  Efficiency would be better with a 21", 22", or 4-blade.  As far as a 115/150 4-stroke, for ANY of you who are considering fishing 3 anglers on the boat, running with both livewells full, or both, then the 115 is totally out of the question.  Think about it rationally.  It's an 18'-10" boat.  Nobody, not Action Craft, Famous Craft, Back Country (while in business), the MA 18, or anyone else, makes a 19' boat that you routinely see with a 115, especially a 4-stroke.  Hewes is the only company that drops a lot of 115’s on nearly 19' boats.  I don't know why.  They build a GREAT boat, but it's not magic or witchcraft.  It's a glass (not Kevlar) hull.  They weigh similarly.  Go with the 150.  Everyone else seems to.  If the boat were a foot shorter and 150-200 pounds less with 6" less beam, I'd say go with the 115.  Don't wet-test it with one other guy, no gear, no water in the well, and 1/2 tank of fuel and think the 115 is sufficient. Test the boat how you intend to leave the ramp.

o       F150. I love to smoke past those Wave Runners. I never want to say "what if I got the F150"?

 

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What are the Pros and Cons of the 21' Redfisher?

 

o       I have an 03 RF 21 with a VZ200. The boat runs 50-52 MPH with full live wells and 3 people. With 2 people, I believe the top speed is about 54 MPH. The fastest I’ve ever got it to was something like 58-60 MPH with just me in it. The 200 that I have is a small block 2.6L so it is very good on gas and oil.  At the time I bought it was about 70lbs lighter than the 225 which is the max rating for the 2003 hull.  I’m not sure Yamaha makes this version of the 200 any longer. The new rating is 250.  I’m guessing that is a mid to upper 60 MPH set up.  It’s very good in chop.  The release well can be plumbed as a bait well.  It’s probably best to have this done at the factory when you order your boat.  I didn’t get this option.  The rear live well on mine is 40 gal and the front live well is 20 gal.

o       The release wells work great as a bait wells.

o       You will easily have over 40K in a new "tricked out" RF18.  I personally like the deck/hatch layout of the 18 over the 21, as do many others. The 18 is easy to handle and tow by yourself.  It’s a perfect mid-size boat.

o       The live wells are great.  We kept two reds alive with the boat on the trailer in 94 degree weather for 3-4 hours.  They were kicking more than when we first boated them.  The release well works fine for bait as well.  Mine will run mid 60's rigged for tournament, full of fuel, and two guys over 220 lbs each.  I've broken 71 MPH by myself with 1/4 tank.  The ride is very good in a chop.  I was very surprised by the ride.  Wet test one and you'll be hooked.  The Maverick Master Angler has a better ride and even more live well capacity.  But you loose some top speed.  I think around 57-59 MPH, fully rigged and loaded with a 250.

 

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Why doesn’t Hewes put Jack Plates on the RF 16'?

 

o       I have one and wish I never got it.  In spite of several propeller changes, the boat cavitates on turns.

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company states “We do not offer a jack plate on the Hewes 16 as the boat is very weight sensitive.  Pushing the engine weight 6" aft really does not help matters.  I know of a few customers that have installed them.  Some like them.  Some do not.

 

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How do I tie the Slim Beauty?

 

o       We build our class section to break slightly over 20 lbs., using 25 lb. Mason. Connect the class section to the butt and the bite tippet with the Slim Beauty Knot.  This is much easier than having to tie two Bimini Knots, and carrying a pre-rigged leader case. The heavier class section should not effect whether a fish bites or not, the bite tippet being the part that scares off fish.  To avoid building a new class section every time you break off, tie on the fly with a modified Homer Rhode Loop Knot which will break before the 25 lb. Mason class section.  It is easy to then just tie on a new fly.  If you want to break in the class section, then use the stronger Non-Slip Loop.

 

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How do I tie the Yucatan Knot for attaching leader to Power Pro?

 

o       The Yucatan is a very slim knot but it does become difficult to tie with leaders over 40 lbs.

 

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How do I tie an Albright Knot in Power Pro and keep it from slipping loose?

 

o       Here is a link to the Power Pro web site.  Power Pro Albright Knot.

 

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Which tension latch was offered on the 2001 17’ Master Angler?  Local dealers didn't have them in stock but were helpful in trying to find them.  I found the OEM parts on Southco's Website.  5lb and 10lb tension latches of the same design are offered.

 

o       Skip states “We used both although the 5lb seemed to be better.  The latches we now use are also a GEM product, part number 1341”.

o       The Gem #1341 hatch latches require some custom fitting and modifications when installing these as replacements for the older plastic latches.  On most of the lids you need to cut small square/rectangular blocks in order for the male end of the hardware to reach down all the way to the female part of the catch (ball-bearing part). In some cases, you need a piece of starboard underneath the female part too.

 

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Is my boat required to have a Coast Guard rating sticker attached?  I bought a used 2000 Maverick HPX-17 tunnel a little over a year ago.  I just realized that is not there.

 

o       Every pleasure craft that is under 6 meters (20 feet) in length that is capable of being fitted with an engine of 7.5 KW (10 HP) or more and is serially produced, must have attached to it in a position easily viewed from the helm a capacity plate. The plate indicates compliance with the Construction Standards for Small Vessels (TP1332) and offers recommended maximum gross load under fair weather conditions, recommended maximum number of adults to be carried onboard and recommended maximum engine size for the craft.  The manufacturer or importer should supply the capacity plate when you purchase a new pleasure craft.  However, the operator of the pleasure craft is responsible to ensure it is there and is subject to fines and penalties if convicted by a law enforcement agency.  Plates issued by US

o       Guard are not accepted in Canada as fulfilling the lawful requirement.  A vessel, to which a capacity plate has been issued and is attached, does not require a conformity plate.

           

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What is the best way to provide raw water to my Bayfisher’s center live well?  I am good to go except for an overflow drain.  I am leaning towards a 1.5 inch overflow through the back of the well that will drain into the motor well and then out the plug holes.  I have seen some mention of a standpipe, but am not familiar with that setup.

 

o       Skip from Maverick Boat Company responds “The Bayfisher has a very small drain in the bottom of the tank. In order for a standpipe to work efficiently, one would need to install a larger drain as you want the same amount of water going out as is coming in.  Because of this limitation, the best bet would be to drain the water out the back of the live well into the splash well as you stated.”

o       Keep in mind that you will need to put a screen over the overflow.

 

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How do I replace a bad Lenco actuator?

o       Hobo offers the following steps:

  1. Look in your bilge area and you should see a black cable about 3/8" in diameter leading from each Lenco Actuator.  This cable leading from the port actuator will have the black plastic insulation skinned back about 3" from the end exposing two encased smaller wires (about 16 gauge).  One of these wires will be white.  The other will be black.  The smaller black wire will be connected to a yellow wire approximately the same size and the white wire will be connected to a green wire.  These connections are made by a heat-shrink covered crimp. 
  2. Cut these wires on both sides of the crimp.  Skin back the ends of both the black and the white wire and either attach about a four-foot piece of string or small wire to the ends of the black/white wires. 
  3. Remove the actuator bracket that is screwed to your boat with three screws.  Remove the other end from the trim tab.  Next, slowly pull the actuator away from the transom all the while pulling the cable along with it.  More than likely, there will be a little 5200 sealing the penetration that was behind the mounting bracket.  It should be pliable enough to pull away and remove. 
  4. Once you get the chase string/wire that is attached to the end of the cable exposed through the access hole cut the string/wire and discard the old actuator.
  5. Attach the cable leading from your new actuator to the chase string/wire and from inside your bilge slowly and carefully pull the new cable through the transom. 
  6. Skin back the end 3-4 inches of this cable exposing a black and white wire.  Remove (skin back) the insulation from the last one-inch or so of these two wires.  Do the same to the yellow and green wires. 
  7. Slide about 3-4 inches of epoxy lined 1/4" diameter heat-shrink over both the yellow and green wires.  Twist the exposed copper wire from the black wire to the yellow wire and repeat this process with the white and green wires.  Solder these respective wires together. 
  8. After the solder joint cools sufficiently, slide the heat shrink centering it over the joint.  Use a heat gun and shrink the heat-shrink being certain that you see liquid epoxy oozing from each end.  While I always double heat-shrink all connections in the bilge area, some might think this is "over-kill". 
  9. Re-attach the mounting bracket to both the transom and the tab.  Squeeze a little 5200 behind the transom bracket and into the penetration to assure a good watertight seal. 
  10. You have now changed out a Lenco actuator.  It shouldn't take but about 20-30 minutes to complete the entire job.

 

o       Lenco offers replacement actuators with two different power cable lengths. If you request the long ones (about 15 feet long), you can get all the way to the console switch and eliminate any splice in the bilge.  It’s possible that those factory connections in the bilge might cause the failure of the actuators.  After I removed them, I stripped back wire and found that the conductors in the wires were corroded back several feet from the butt connectors.  So, like Hobo advises, if you have to make a connection in the bilge, then the solder and double heat shrink method is the way to go.  Be sure to get the expensive shrink with the adhesive in it.

 

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How do I find out why both of my trim tabs quit working?  There doesn’t seem to be any power to the switches.

 

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company advises:  There is no reset button.  It sounds like a power problem, as it is very rare for both to stop- working at once.

o       Hobo notes:  Your trim tab's source of power is the accessory fuse-block.  It will most likely be the only accessory with a 20 amp fuse.

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How do I figure out why one of my trim tabs quit working?

 

o       I had a similar problem.  Although the actuator switch for the starboard side looked OK and I cleaned the terminals, it still failed to operate the tab.  It turned out the switch was bad.  I replaced both switches and that took care of the problem.

o       I had mine go last year.  Unfortunately, the wire had corroded to the actuator.  I had to replace the whole thing.

o       It might not be the switches, but the little black control box under the console. I've had mine replaced twice already.

o       HOBO suggests the following:

      The butt-spliced connection between the actuator’s pig-tail and the connecting wiring leading up to the switches on the console frequently causes the actuator to quit working. These shrinkable mechanic butt splices are VERY prone to failure in a constant bilge type environment, especially in salt water.  I don't like them for this reason and DO NOT use them.

I recommend cutting out these butt splices.  There will be a total of four, two on each side,  Each of the actuators will have a 5/16" diameter cable leading from it.  Somewhere in your bilge area, you will find these splices, usually almost directly underneath the bilge inspection/access port in the splash well.  The 5/16" black cable will be "skinned back" about 3-4 inches from the end, exposing two smaller (about 14 gauge) wires.  One is white and the other is black.

Port Side Actuator----- Black wire to Yellow wire and White wire to Green wire
Starboard Actuator---- Black wire to Blue wire and White wire to Red wire

After you cut out these butt splices, skin back each of the eight wire ends and inspect for any signs of saltwater intrusion.  This will be evidenced by the bare wire strands looking either black or green instead of a shinny copper or silver color.  Cut out and/or replace any damaged wire.

Before reconnecting these splices, go ahead and check to be sure each actuator is working okay.  To do this, take both the white and black wire from each actuator (one at a time) and touch them to a reliable 12 vdc source.  It doesn't make any difference which wire you put to what pole.  If you hear and see the actuator operating, then switch the poles and observe the actuator traveling in the opposite direction.  If the tab is in the fully retracted position and you happen touch the leads to the battery and you hear a noise but the actuator doesn't move, don't be alarmed.  If you happen to touch the leads to operate in the retract position and it is already retracted you will only hear the actuator motor running.  This is normal operation.  Just reverse the leads at this time and you should see the actuator extending.

After confirming that the actuators are functioning properly, go ahead and reconnect the splices.  Slide a 3" piece of a good grade epoxy lined 3/16" diameter heat-shrink along with a 4" piece of 1/4" diameter heat-shrink onto each of the wire sets.  Twist the wires together and then solder the splice.  Slide the 3/16" shrink onto the center of the splice.  Shrink it till you see liquid epoxy oozing out of each end.  After allowing this shrink to cool, repeat the process with the 1/4" x 4" shrink.  This piece should extend 1/2" beyond each end of the 3/16" shrink.  THIS CONNECTION WILL NOT LEAK

Even if you do have a bad actuator you would still have had to cut out the splice anyhow. So you haven't lost anything!  I would say the odds of the splice being bad instead of the actuator would be something like 75/25.  Pretty good odds and a whole lot cheaper!

 

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What is the top end speed on the 18' Master Angler with a 175 HP Motor?  I've seen the performance bulletin with a F150 but not a 175. Will she run 60 plus?

 

o       No

o       A 150 HPDI at 5600 RPMs gets 52-53 MPH lightly loaded. 60 MPH with a 175?  Maybe.          

o       I've had both Mercury 150 and 175 EFIs.  There is very little difference between the two.  The 150 gets 53-56 MPH while the 175 gets 54-58 MPH depending on gas load. The 175 does have more torque. I’m currently running new Opti 150 and am getting 56 MPH on a full tank.

 

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How do Maverick and Hewes compare to each other in the MHP lineup?  It seems to me that Maverick's and Hewes’ fill many of the same product niches. 

 

o       Both boats are great products when used for what they are designed to do. The kind of fishing you do and how you do it will help you decide which boat would better fit your fishing style. If you fish with two people, pole very little, use the electric motor a lot, fish in a foot or more water, and travel over some rough water in the backcountry, then the Hewes 16’ Redfisher would be a great boat for you.

o       Mavericks cost more.  Mavericks, over the years, have set more level in the water.  The process in building a Maverick is more expensive.  Usually, hardware is a little better grade.  The Redfisher is faster than the Master Angler until you cross big water on a windy day.

o       Pathfinder (except 1700 tunnel) owns the offshore/inshore/family/fisherman niche.  Maverick owns the technical/fishing only/high tech materials and construction niche.  Hewes has evolved to be the bridge.  Of course, tons of serious fishermen prefer a brand other than Maverick.  I've even water skied behind a Maverick.  All three do certain things better than the other two.

o       I am not sure it is a matter of one being better than the other. The HPX's have their own niche as "technical poling skiffs", so I am assuming that you are comparing the Master Angler to the Redfisher.

o       It all boils down to the deck layout. You must decide which works better for your style of fishing. The hulls are slightly different with the Redfisher's being more efficient (faster with less horsepower required), and the Master Angler being slightly better in rough, choppy water with its sharp bow entry.  Which is better? The one you own!

o       Both are great boats, but truth be told, the HPX-V is superior. It is a top of the line technical poling skiff with a superior ride.  The RF16 is a great boat and can get the job done in most situations.  If you want a great overall boat and cost is a factor, the RF16 fits most people well.  If you want to baddest skiff in the MHP line for getting shallow and poling effortlessly the HPX is the best choice.

o       The Hewes 16 has more deck area. The HPXV will go shallower. If you will be carrying 3 or 4 people, the Hewes is better, although fishing is pretty much limited to a maximum of 3 people.  If you primarily fish 1 or 2, then the HPXV is better, although 3 will work in the HPXV.  I moved from a Maverick 18.5 to the HPXV 17 and was amazed at how well the HPXV handles the rough stuff.  I have also owned a Hewes 16 and it was a great little boat.  I had a 115 Johnson on the back and that was too heavy.  The boat really squatted in the stern when at rest.  A 2 stroke 90 is a great engine for either boat.

 

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Would there be an issue by trying to install a 17 MA console in a 18.5 MA?

 

o       Skip states “The Maverick line does not have a console boss in the floor.  We can install any console in almost any location you like.  No so, on the Hewes and Pathfinder lines.”

 

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Does the 2000 17’ Master Angler have a metal tank and what is its capacity?

 

o       Skip states “Yes, it is a 40 gal aluminum tank”.

 

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What are the differences between the 15’ HPX and 17’ HPX-T?

 

o       Skip states “The 17’ HPX-V model has a little better ride as the T is flat on the bottom. The 15’ HPX is really a 2 person boat.  You could add one more on the T. Draft is going to be close although the T will run and get up in less.

o       The 15’ HPX is a great little boat.  Poling draft is the same, if not better, than the 17T, but running draft is no where near the 17T. It is useless to try and pole the 15’ HPX boat by yourself.  The 17T also needs the balance of two anglers to adequately pole, but is better than the 15’ HPX.

 

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What is the difference between the 17’ HPX and 18’ HPX?

 

o       The 17’ V has a good ride but is a little tipsy while the 18’ V's ride is not as good as the 17’ V.

o       The draft of the 18’ V is actually less.  The 18V is wider and more stable.

o       The 17 is very weight sensitive and storage could be an issue.  You have to be well organized and keep everything put away or there will not be much room to move with 3 people.  However, it's great as far as poling, good ride.  It’s very quiet too.

o       The 18’ V a great boat.  You can still cross the bay in a chop.  You can pole it all day and not get tired.  The livewell works for bait and you can fish 3 out of it fine which I do a lot.

o       With two anglers and yourself on the 17, you'll need to stay up on the poling platform all day just so that your anglers can begin to have enough room.  The 17 is ideal for one on the bow and one on the poling platform.

o       I just purchased a new HPX 18 about three months ago.  I owned an Action Craft Flatsmaster about 15 years ago and an 18 Egret Carbon Kevlar.  I like the HPX 18 much better than either of those boats for my use.  My Action Craft was a much wetter boat, heavier and did not pole nearly as well.  The Egret is actually more akin to a small bay boat, has much more draft and is very hard to pole.  The HPX 18 is a real flats boat but it has great stability and is easy to pole.  I have the 115 Yamaha with bow mount trolling motor and just installed a power pole.  I am very pleased with the rig.  I do not fish in rough water or weather on purpose but if you want to fish in the ocean, I would not recommend the boat as it is a flats boat with flatter bottom than the Egret.  I am 66 years old and have no problem on the poling platform. It is extremely stable and the boat poles as well as when I poled the 17 HPXV but with much more stability.  I have the release well plumbed and the live well is quite large.  I rarely use more than the live well set to be partially filled which is possible with some short overflows furnished as an accessory.  One thing that I particularly like about the boat is that it will plane out with almost no bow rise when tabs are down and it will plane at very low speed due to width and lightness, I believe.  Power pole is a great accessory.  I had never had one before but would not do without one now.

 

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When was the style of gunnel rod holders changed on the Master Angler 17 and 18.5?  The older style is where they are an integral part of the hull with "cut outs" where one can see the foam core.  The newer style plastic holders are bolted onto the hull under the gunnels.

 

o       Skip states “I think it was in the 2001 model year.  Prior to that, they were built in and made out of fiberglass.”

o       Skip might be incorrect as my 1998 has the plastic holders that are screwed on.

 

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What kind of top speed can be obtained with the 17’ Master Angler and a Yamaha F115?

 

o       On a 2005 17’ Master Angler with F115, a 4 blade prop, two people on board, one-half tank of gas and not much chop produced 46 MPH on the GPS.

 

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What is the best prop set up for the 17’ HPX-V?

 

o       The top transom bolts are in the top hole of the engine bracket.  In other words, the engine is mounted as low as it will go.  The tilt rod assembly is in the hole nearest the transom meaning the engine can be tucked in all the way when trimming it down.  My prop is a PowerTech 3 blade, 17 pitch, model number YM90PTR3R17P.  These boats are sensitive to engine trim, trim tabs, how the engine is mounted, weight distribution and especially props.  Start with the proper engine mounting, then get the right PowerTech prop and then start learning how to handle the trim and tabs.  It is a fantastic boat.

o       Bob L advises:

Ø      As long as the engine is mounted in one of the two lowest positions, you are in good shape. 

Ø      The key is to get the PowerTech prop mentioned above.  Others brands, even with the same pitch, haven't worked as well as the PowerTech.  The PTR series is a “bow lifter” prop, which supposedly reduces the wetted surface giving you better speed.  PowerTech will tell you to stick with the 3-blade version, although at least one forum member runs the 4-blade with good success.

Ø      To confuse the issue more, Ft. Myers Marine puts the PowerTech YM90SCD3R18P on the HPX-V/90 2-stroke.  The SCD series is a “stern lifter”, and theoretically is better for running shallow, giving up a little speed over the PTR series.  They apparently feel the SCD is a better match for their shallow, protected redfish waters.

Ø      I personally think the SCD series is better suited to the super-shallow running HPX-T which is usually operated in more protected waters.  Theoretically, the PTR3R (the “3” means 3-blade) will give the HPX-V a little extra speed and raise the bow as much as possible for the rough seas in which the HPX-V was built to excel.  The PTR runs more than shallow enough for me and, in my opinion, is the better rough water prop for the “V”.  It’s just a great match.

Ø      If you must lower the engine, I would go ahead and lower it all the way down for worst-case seas.  My boat is set up this way, but quite frankly there was no need for me to have lowered it from the “one up” position as I did.  In Biscayne Bay’s heavy chop and yacht wakes, it hasn’t made a big difference.  The lowest position only helps in really nasty, large swells such as my guide in Key West has taken me through.  Coming over and down the face of a wave, you do not want the prop to come out of the water and lose forward thrust.  If it does, the bow drops immediately, which is kind of dangerous since it can cause you to bury the nose in the next wave.  With the prop in the lowest position this is less likely to happen.  Caribee Marine in Islamorada will always recommend that you lower the engine as far as possible for this reason.  I guess it just sort of depends on your particular waters.

Ø      The boat handles like a jet fighter that requires a gentle hand.  If you try to throw it around like an old Dodge truck on a dirt road, the prop will come loose.  Before I make a significant turn, I will pull back on the power and lower the engine a bit.  Coming out of the turn, I will power back up and trim the engine up again.  It gets to be second nature after awhile.

 

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What is the best motor for the 17’ HPX-V?

 

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company advises:  The Yamaha F90 or the plain ole' carbed 90 are really the way to go on the 17HPX.

      Bob L offers the following comments:  I thought I would throw out some numbers for everyone to see:

Evinrude:
      E-Tec 115                 369 lbs          60-deg. V-4
      E-Tec 90                   320 lbs          3-cyl

Mercury:
      Optimax 115/90        375 lbs          3-cyl (same block)

Yamaha:
      F115 4-stroke           466 lbs          4-cyl inline
      115 carbed 2-stroke  358 lbs          90 deg. V-4
      F90 4-stroke             369 lbs          4-cyl inline
      90 carbed 2-stroke    261 lbs          3-cyl

Of these engines, I would not consider the Yamaha F115 for weight reasons, nor the Mercury 115/90 which are rough running 3-cylinders. If the question just boils down to the suitability of the Evinrude 115 E-Tec for the 17’ HPXV, then I say yes!  I could be wrong, but I can't imagine that the 115 E-Tec would impart any different handling characteristics on this platform, when compared to the carbed, Yamaha 115.  If a 115 is part of your requirements, then by all means, be the first of us to put a 115 E-Tec on an HPX-V!

 

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What are the pros and cons of a side console on the 17’ HPXV?

 

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company advises:  No problem on the side console.  It’s easy to do.

o       BOB L offers the following thoughts:  A side console on the HPX-V?  -I personally would not.  When I think of side-consoles, I think of skiffs that are used in more sheltered waters than the HPX-V was designed for.  If you were considering an HPX-T, then I would say go ahead.  What you might gain in weight-savings and deck space with a side-console, you will lose in rough water suitability, which is what the "V" is all about.   Let's assume you have three people onboard.  To balance things out you should have one passenger sit in front of the center-console, and the other next to the helmsman behind the console.  In bad wind and seas, the forward passenger is surprisingly well protected by the spray rails no matter how hard it blows, and the aft passenger will be well protected sitting to the lee of the helmsman who can easily stand/sit in the center of the bench.  Should a strong wind/sea be directly off the beam, then even with the weather side of the boat trimmed up, some water is going to get away from the spray rail before it can be channeled aft of the rear bench.  This may wet the weather-side of the bench, but it won't wet the helmsman or the rear passenger, who are both to leeward as the spray moves aft past them.  Now let's assume the same scenario, but with a side-console.  First, the helmsman cannot standup to look for rogue waves - he is confined to sitting down which I feel is a disadvantage in heavy seas.  And the obvious, he cannot move away from the rail if the wind is blowing over the same side as the console.  If your home waters don't require you to cross rough water very often, then you might prefer a side-console's advantages.  I would also verify that your idea of a side-console is Skip's idea of a side-console.  I suspect that he was just talking about moving the standard console to the right.  If this is the case, then you might have rod access issues on that side.  This is a guess, but I would worry that a side-console would limit the resale-ability of an HPX-V.  I'm not saying that it would, but you might add it to your list of things to consider.

 

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How tippy is the 17’ HPXV?

o       When I was looking at all the MHP line at Lindsay Marine in Stuart, FL the salesman said that the HPX was pretty tippy and was meant for what its designed to do.  That is, be a "technical poling skiff".

o       I have quite a bit of time on all three boats (and the HPX-T).  The HPX is, IMHO, considerably more tippy than the MA's.  Bob L. has said it many times. "If you fish 3, they better be skiff-savvy and have good balance".  There are so many other great things about this boat.  The tippy question almost feels like a cheap shot.  I've gone 16 Deluxe, 16 Deluxe, 18MA, HPX-V. I love my HPX!

o       The first time you step onto the gunwale of an HPX, it will dip to an extent that may surprise you, but only because walking on a Master Angler's gunwales is a lot like walking on the deck of an aircraft carrier. It's all relative.  As Skip says, it is a bit more of a tender hull, but when you consider what you get for it, it very quickly fades to insignificance.  I continue to be astounded at how good the ride in nasty water is, and I can now go places I could only envy from afar in the Master Angler.  For me, moving from the MA to the HPX-V was a great decision.  Would I hate to be on the poling platform and have two other guys on board make a rush to the same side of the boat?  Sure, but that would have been true on the MA, too.  Short version is yes, it's a little more tender, and it's something you learn to live with very quickly.

o       Bob L notes:  Your question has to do with relative stability.  The problem is, if you are comparing the HPX-V to the 18.5 Master Angler then you are comparing it to one of the most stable boats that I have experienced.  You really should spend a day on the water in an HPX-V to see for yourself.  I encourage you to book a trip with one of the guides here on the forum.  It would be money well spent.

 

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What is the best height position for a Yamaha 60 HP four stroke on the HPX-T?

 

o       Skip at the Maverick Boat Company, states “We install most every engine at the lowest setting here at the plant. You then can take it on your own to raise your engine dependent on prop selection.”

o       After working with Marcus at Power Tech, and getting a good prop for this rig (YM90SCD14R4), I was able to raise the motor to the second highest position available.  The bottom line is that prop selection determines how high or low you can mount the motor.

o       I've got my T60 mounted one-up. I tried to get it higher.  But when I did, the steering rod contacts the port side of the platform.

 

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Where can I get information on my Yamaha Motor?  I don’t have my Owner’s Manual.

 

o       Marcus (Funky Monkey) at Power Tech advises that you check out the following Yamaha website.  Yamaha Owner’s Manual Online.  It is loaded with information about your respective motor.

 

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How do I fix my trim indicator that quit working?

 

o       If your gauge is constantly showing your engine trimmed all the way up, it is most likely the trim sender cam.

o       Hamfisted states “Item #1 below is the trim sender cam. It’s just a plastic ring around the hinge shaft and they always break. The p/n is 64E-43139-02-00.  They're about $3 at the dealer.  You can usually unscrew that Philips head screw and spread the ring to pop it off. Warm up the new one with a hot air gun before putting the new one on to make it more pliable.”

                                               

o       In addition to inspecting/replacing the sender cam, raise the motor all the way up (drop down the locking lever for safety) and check the sender arm for easy movement.  Sometimes debris/corrosion can make the arm stick, and this will mess up the reading on the trim gauge. Squirt some WD-40 at the base of the arm where it goes into the housing of the sender and move the arm through its range a couple of times.  Turn on the ignition power and move the sender arm by hand through its range.  The gauge should read from maximum to minimum trim.

o       Solution: I removed a bunch of grease and cleaned up the area around the arm.  Now everything works fine.

 

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How do I fix the trim tab switch on a Quicksilver throttle?

 

o       Try a squirt of WD-40.

 

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How do I stop the loud squealing noise on my F115 when trimming it up and down?

 

o       Raise the motor all the way up.  Drop down the locking lever for safety.  Apply a thin film of marine grease (I use Mobil 1 synthetic for its water resistance) to the trim/tilt piston on the sides and ends.
If this does not get rid of the squeal, then you have a problem with the pump.

o       Or, you might just be a little low on fluid for your pump.  If you add fluid, be sure to bleed the system or it will continue to squeak at the beginning and end of the tilt process.  If you have to add fluid, be sure to carefully look for leaks to make sure a seal has not failed.

 

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How do I fix the low oil message on my Yamaha gauge?  The reservoir is ¾ full, but the tank on the motor is ¼ full.  After waiting about 10 minutes, it will run for another 10 minutes and then the low oil message reappears.  It seems that the oil is not being pumped into the motor tank fast enough.

 

o       Hobo advises “The strainer on your 2.5 gallon oil storage tank is clogged.  Clean, or better still, replace the in-line strainer situated in the oil hose line between the oil tank and the oil transfer pump on the reservoir oil tank.  It will be held in place with two small tie-wraps on each side of the strainer.  The strainer will be about the size of a large marble and made from the same material as the tank.

 

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Why is my water pressure gauge only reading around 10 psi since it normally reads around 25 psi?  It happened after the overheating alarm went off due to accumulating grass over the water intake.

 

o       It’s unlikely that the grass hurt the impeller.  Sand and debris will wear it down over time, however.  It is possible there is some debris in or near the nipple where the water pressure gauge is connected to the engine.  Before taking things apart, try this simple procedure as described by a Yamaha tech.  Spray some WD-40 into the pee hole following that with some high pressure air until you see it coming out the lower unit.  Then flush the engine with water while running as usual.

o       You might want to check the pressure control valve, aka pressure relief valve, aka poppit valve.  It could have debris stuck around it keeping it open and allowing cooling water to dump out the relief holes pre-maturely. This can definitely lower your water pressure.  Also, you might want to upgrade to the new "mushroom" head style PCV.  It is supposed to be less prone to getting debris stuck around it.

 

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What is involved in doing my own Yamaha Motor maintenance and what are the costs

o       Dino offers the following advice:

1.)    Get the F150 manual from Yamaha

2.)    Get to know your service guys and buy all your parts and stuff from a local dealer.  They will help you if you develop a good rapport.  I think the guys at Boat Center are the tops.  They are much better than any M/H/P dealer's mechanics that I've met in my local area since 2000 when I bought my first RF18.  I highly recommend any work on engines or systems that are not warranty going to them if you are in the area.  They are a first class, clean operation.

3.)    BTW, when I was speaking with the service guy at BC today, he mentioned that some of their mechanics recently returned from some training where there were guys from the military who were receiving training as well on Yamahas.  He said one guy in the military mentioned they had as much as 5,000 hrs on some of their F150's with just basic maintenance as described by the service manuals.  Good compression, etc.  They just use all the recommended products and service as required.  I've got 312 hrs on mine and not a sputter.

4.)  Material Costs:
               Oil @ $5 / quart = $25
               Gear lube about $10
               Plugs @ $6.50 = $25
               Oil Filter = $25
               Ceramics = $2
               Racor Filter = $25
               Fuel Filter on engine: $25
               Rags / Misc: $10
                           Total Parts: About $150
5.)  Time:   Figure about 1.5 hours including set up.  I go slow and read and recheck stuff.

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How do I change the lower unit oil on my Yamaha four stroke?

o       Dino offers the following process:

First, remove the bottom screw, then the top.  The oil will then drain out.  I keep a bit in a bowl for inspection.  I like to see it clean, not milky.



Get a gallon of lower unit oil from your Yamaha dealer and buy the pump.  It's really easy.  Just screw it into the top of the gallon of oil then into the bottom of the lower unit.  Pump the oil in until it pushes just out the top.  Be sure to keep the lower unit level.  When the oil comes out the top, Replace the top screw.  Remove the pump and quickly replace the lower screw.



When replacing the screws, be sure to check to see whether the ceramic washers are cracked.  I just buy new ones to insure no water will enter.  They cost about $1.00 per screw.  Well worth it.  Be sure to check the bottom screw for excess shavings.  Mine had a minimum amount of whiskers.  It looks about like a few days stubble on the beard.  Tech's say it normal for a bit to be on the bottom screw.  It is magnetized.  Again, don't over tighten the screws which results in cracking the ceramic washers.



When doing both the motor oil and the lower unit oil change, I let the lower unit continue to drain while I get the four stroke oil ready to be drained.

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How do I change the oil and oil filter on my Yamaha 4 stroke motor? 

o       Dino offers the following procedure:

I put a large bag over the lower unit to catch it because it goes everywhere.



Yeah, it's a mess.  You can get a pump from Tempo, but they are about $50 or so.  I figure I'll just get my hands dirty.

   

While the oil is draining, I usually am doing some other activity, like changing plugs, etc.  After the oil is fully drained, I replace the plug.  Be sure to inspect the washer to make sure it is not cracked.

 

o       Now change out the oil filter.



Off with old and on with the new.  Simple, but don't forget to rub a bit of clean oil on the threads and O ring to provide a good seal.



After adding new oil, check the dip stick for proper level.  Now is a good time to spray on some more LPS to the engine and crank her up.  Run for about 15 minutes to check for any leaks.  It’s a good idea to do this for any of the maintenance activities.



o       Jeff1234 observes -  After my first oil change I went ahead and bought the pump.  To me it’s an incredibly good investment.  You start the siphon and then do all the other stuff while it slowly drains.

o       Fish Food notes - As far as the oil mess, I use a funnel and a clear tube that fits the spout of the funnel.  It is cut to the length required to drain right into my oil pan. There is still some mess, but it sure eliminates most of it. I also use a bit of anti-seize on my spark plugs and a torque wrench.  I think I grew up with my Dad breaking too many screws and I worry about doing the same on my boat!

 

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 How do I change my spark plugs on my Yamaha motor?

o       Dino offers the following technique:

Here are several tips.
1.) Get a small tube to put over the ceramic to set them back into position.
2.) Set your gap too. Use the manual as you can see in the picture.
3.) Tighten to appropriate torque or snug as they told me at the dealer.  Don't over tighten or you can break it.
4.) I put a little bit of clean oil on the threads.
5.) If dirty, clean the connectors on the top of the plug.
6.) While my plugs had about 125 hours on them, they were fine.  But for $25, I decided to change them out anyway.  This is my second set.  My first set had about 192 hours and they looked the same.  I'll leave them in now until 500 hours which will be a major tune up that I'll probably have the guys at BC do as the will need to check valves, etc.

Here are pictures of the plugs, gap tool, tube, and method putting them back in.

    

No carbon build up.  I use Ring free.  I love it.


       

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 How do I change the gas filter on my Yamaha motor?

o       Dino offers this explanation:

The gas filter is located under the cowl and right in front.



Be sure to get an extra set of O rings in case you crack one.  The filter does not come with the O ring kit.  You just take it off by unscrewing.  Pour out all the fuel.  Replace items in the same order being sure not to forget the O ring inside the filter and replace securely.  After you replace everything, pump the primer ball a few times to fill it up.  It takes about 10 squeezes of the pump.


 

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How do I lubricate the zerk fittings on my Yamaha motor?

o       Dino suggests doing the following:

Get out the grease gun and start hitting all the zerk fittings.   I use the Yamaha small grease gun with a hose length extender.  It allows you to get around all the zerk fittings.  Finding them is like an Easter egg hunt.  Just get out the manual and read where they are all located.

 

If you have one, don’t forget the Bob's Jack Plate.  According to their website, you need two people.  One makes the Jack Plate go up and down and the other pushes the grease.  They say don't over grease, so I only do it every 100 hours.



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What is involved in a new Navman installation?

 

o       Candle advises:

Ø      Instructions should come with the unit.

Ø      First, you must install the flow meter mechanism by cutting the fuel line and inserting the measuring device.  Just make sure you give yourself some room to tighten the clamps.

Ø      Next, you must route the cable from the flow mechanism through your conduit and up under the console.  I used a pull string and silicone grease to aid the pull.

Ø      Cutting the hole into the console is no big deal.  Once you decide on a location, place duct tape or painter's tape over the area and use a sharp hole saw.  The tape should prevent chipping of the gelcoat.

Ø      Now comes the challenge.  You must remove the ignition switch and solder a pigtail to the switch terminal.  I think it's the yellow wire.  Ask Hobo.  Then electrically attach the power cable from the NAVMAN to the pigtail and ground the other side.  This way, the NAVMAN comes on when you turn the ignition switch.  The challenge is that the ignition switch is very compact and has little space in which to maneuver.  I took the switch off completely and did the soldering on my work bench.

 

o       The only difference is that I found a BLUE wire under the console in the harness behind the Yamaha gauges that delivered +12 vdc when the ignition was switched on.  This wire was not in use.  It had a bullet connector on the end.  I crimped a matching connector on the red lead wire going to the Navman and grounded the black.  I have not had any problems with it.  It made for an easier install than trying to work with the ignition switch.

o       I didn't have the same issue that Candle mentioned when I installed on my PF.  I had some extra yellow pigtails available in my wiring harness.  I simply crimped on a male end and plugged into it.  I grounded the black wire on the fuse panel and was in business.

o       Dino suggests a couple of hints.

Ø      Be sure to get a large tin pan to catch the gas when you cut the line to install the flow meter.

Ø      Get lots of clean rags handy.

Ø      Have your clamps ready.  Double clamps are better.  I went with a single.

Ø      Use lots of soap to pull the wiring and be sure to use lots of duct tape on the end to allow it to pass through.  Don't forget to run an additional chase rope to use the next time you have to run wires.

Ø      Use a 2 1/8 inch hole saw for the gauge.

o       Hobo comments: The Yamaha Fuel Management flow sensor has to me mounted in the horizontal position as per Yamaha's directives.  The Navman Fuel Management flow sensor is to be installed in the vertical position as per the Navman instructions.  I have installed MANY of both models and they both have always worked great when installed according to the installation instructions.

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Is my Navman 2100 broken?  When I turn on the ignition switch, I hit Flow.  When I run full I’ve seen the flow at almost 70.  When I hit total, it remains at 0.0 for the whole day, not moving.

 

o       Hobo advises: When all else fails “Read the instruction manual!!!  It sounds like you still have your unit set up the way it came "out of the box", which is in metric units.  It sounds like you are reading liters-per-hour instead of gallons-per-hour.  Have you set your unit up entering your fuel tank's capacity?  Something definitely doesn't sound right.  If you are getting even a wrong flow reading, you should be getting a "Total Fuel Used" reading.

 

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What is the fix for the water intrusion problem on the 22’ Pathfinder?  My feet are wet constantly.

 

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company states “There are in line check valves installed in your self bailing scupper lines located in the bilge. If you are getting water back flowing through them, something is wrong.  Either the check valve is not working properly or it needs to be cleaned as debris in the valve will not allow the flapper to close completely.  I would bet money the valve needs cleaning.  We have built thousands of Pathfinder bay boats. This is a very isolated problem and this is the fix.”

o       It is easy to blast the drains directly with a water hose to keep the valves free of debris.

o       Another other option is to buy the new 2007 2200 XL with a 25" transom. The 5 inch higher transom allows the deck to be above the waterline and eliminate the water intrusion problem.

o       I have a 2005 2200V.  Yes, I have water coming in on the port side scupper drain and yes, the dealer gave me a set of plugs to install in the drains. However, the plugs I tossed in the trash.  Water on the deck is OK with me. We fish for hybrid bass and when caught they will bleed, pee, and poop all over the deck.  So with my handy raw water wash down, we are always washing the deck. As for the check valves in the scupper hoses, they are always filling up with fish scales, fishing line and just junk.  This just means you are putting fish in the boat. Please do not forget this is a fishing boat. Treat it as such.

o       Another very successful fix to this problem is the installation of Rabud Sea Scuppers from Dusky Marine in Dania FL.  They come in clear and white.  You also need an adapter-spacer ring (donut) which is necessary to mount the Rabud Sea Scuppers.  Order the large size.  In order for the donut to fit, it must be shaved down with a Dremel tool on the inside of the donut.  Dusky Marine’s phone number is (954) 922-8890, Mon thru Sat, 8-5 EST.  Ask for the Ship’s Store.

o       Here are a few pictures of the Rabud Sea Scupper installation.

                                           
 
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What is the best power for the PF2200?

 

o                   I have the 200 HPDI at  475Lbs. and I am thoroughly happy with it.  At 55 mph, it gives me all the speed I ever need.  It is awesome on gas mileage.  It is also light enough that the stern doesn't squat in the water so I don't have to worry about the water intrusion.   And it's built on the tried and true 2.6 block.

o                   Skip from the Maverick boat company notes: “IMHO, on the 22TE the VZ200 is the way to go and on the standard 22, the F150 is the best choice.  The VZ200 is 3.3 liters and the VMax 200 is 2.8 liters.  Bigger block = more weight.  I suggest the larger power on the TE because of the extra weight of the three standard livewells.  You fill over 100 gallons of livewells with bait and the extra 50 HP comes in handy.”

o                   Speed Freak, GeeLoomis advises:  Except for Dino, get the 250 HPDI VMax.  Top speed is near 63 mph.  Then once you get used to that, call Nathan Worthy at Hydrotec Marine.  Make sure you drop my name so that I might be able to get a discount when I get the next urge to boost the power on my future boat.  Get the Phase II package with high performance heads, reeds, and tuner for the exhaust.  This will make your 250 a 300 hp engine.  The package costs $1680 plus labor which you can do or have anyone do.  You WILL have to go up two inches in pitch on your prop from before and you will gain 5 mph on your top end.  Shoot.  We saw 68 mph with a four blade prop.  If you can stay out of it, the midrange fuel economy is just plain incredible, which really starts to infringe on four stroke territory.  This is only if you want to and like to go faster than the other bay boats.”

 

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What is the best power for the PF2400?

 

o       HOBO advises:  I have owned two 24' Pathfinders.  On my 2002 model, I had a 200 HPDI (small block).  It would run 50-51 and could easily cruise at 42 mph while sipping around 4.4-4.6 mpg.  Definitely a great combination.  My 2003 24' PF had a 250 HPDI, a very strong motor.  I ran a 4-blade Power-Tech and saw 57-58 mph a couple of times.  But most of the time, the top-end speed was 55-56 mph.  It would cruise at 42 mph while turning 4000 rpm and burning 4.2-4.4 mpg.  My only recommendation with this engine is to be sure to get the extended warranty.  Yamaha has had a lot of issues with these power heads failing due to lubrication problems.  I did go through three power heads although all were covered under warranty.  Would I buy another 250 HPDI.   YES, but only if the new F250 were not an option.  I would definitely go with the F250 if I were buying a new 2400 Pathfinder.

 

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Does anyone know of a rail or handle that can be used to lean on or stabilize your self while on the poling platform?  I'd really like to be able to stand up there and concentrate on fishing versus balancing.

 

o       In the Houston area, check out Tops N Towers.

o       The design shown below is removable.

                                      

 

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Can a Power Pole be mounted on a 16’ Redfisher?  It seems that there is very little room.

 

o       When the Power Pole is mounted to the transom over the trim tab; you can’t engage it in water over 4 feet because it will hit the trim tab.

o       I have a six foot Power Pole on my 2004 16’ Redfisher mounted in line with the starboard trim tab.  I have 9 inch Bennett trim tabs, however.  On my boat, the Power Pole mounting bracket extends about 1/2 inch beyond the trim tab.  The Power Pole, at full extension, will clear the tab by about the same amount.  However, I don't use full extension as the Power Pole won't hold.

o       The Power Pole Tech reports: “We manufacture an adapter plate that will fit the Redfisher.  It mounts between the motor and the hull and sets the Power-Pole right behind the rear leg of the poling platform.  Although the boat pictured below is not a RF 16, but instead a 20 LT with the Adapter Plate you will need on the RF 16.  The adapter plate you see in the picture will work on all the Hewes Redfisher, Bayfisher, Light Tackle, and Bonefisher models with recessed tabs and non recessed tabs.  If you do not have a jack plate on the boat, you will need the AP-S190M for motor only applications. If you do have a jack plate, you'll need the AP-S190B.  If you have any questions email me at branden@powerpole.com.

 

                          

 

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Can an average guy install a Power Pole by himself?

 

o       The bracket mount will require a cherry hoist to hold the motor while you fit the bracket between the motor and transom.  The bracket mount does flex some.  You will need to make sure you will have clearance for things like the poling tower or trolling brackets.   The rest of the install is pretty straight forward and is outlined in the instructions. Be prepared to solder and heat shrink.

o       It is a little easier with an extra set of hands.

o       Mike, at Master Repair, suggests not using the bracket and recommends the transom installation.  He installs quite a number of units.  You can decide for yourself.

o       I’m happy with my bracket.

 

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What is the best length Power Pole to install on a HPX-T?

 

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company advises: “I have seen both but if it was mine, the 6’ is plenty for an ultra shallow water boat like the HPXT.”

o       QuickRelease notes “I would think you will be very happy with the 6.  I know I am.  You will want a manual switch just in case the remote goes out.  I mounted mine under the wheel and use it much more than I thought I would.

 

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 What size prop should I run on my 20’ Pathfinder?

 

o       2000V, Yamaha F150.  I run an SCE419 4 blade semi-cleaver series prop that Marcus Clement recommended.  The hole shot is less than 3 seconds.  The bow rise is virtually none.  I am able to maintain a plane down to 2100-2200.  There is no cavitation on turns.  I could force it to cavitate if I trimmed the engine high and gunned it from a standstill.  Porpoising is almost gone. Not 100% but close.  The hull has a propensity to launch off at around 3000-3500 if running into a headwind.

 
The following tests were run with a full tank and safety gear onboard.
Trim tabs were in full up position and all trimming was done via engine. It turned out be rather windy day, about 17 mph according to the weatherman. I found a relatively calm pocket of the lake with a light chop to run the tests. All speeds were via GPS. All fuel flow was via Yamaha Command Link fuel mgmt system.



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 What size prop should I run on my 22’ Pathfinder?

o       22PF, Yamaha 150 SW OX66, VMAX, Jack Plate.

Ø      Funky Monkey set me up with the Power Tech 4 blade OFX 18 pitch. It hits about 48 mph at 5500 rpm, with a normal load.  There is NO cavitation!  You can turn my boat, doing 40 mph and it sticks like a Nextel Cup Car! The hole shot is better than you will expect. I want to say that it will jump up in less than 2 boat lengths.  I have been pleased with the performance of the OFX and I won't go back to a 3 blade.

o       22PF, Yamaha F150, Jack Plate.

Ø      I have a 17 pitch, OFX 1/4 vented 4 blade.  WOT at 6000 rpm’s gets 45-46 MPH with a light load with 43-45 MPH being more normal.

Ø      Funky Monkey advises: For the 2–stroke, I would definitely run the OFX 4-blade, since you are running a jack plate.  The 18 pitch ported at 3/8” should be on the money.  The 2-stroke can take a touch more pitch than the 4-stroke.

o       22PF, Yamaha VMAX 200 HPDI, Jack Plate.

Ø       I wanted a great hole shot and decent cruise and top end.  I run a PowerTech, 4 blade, OFX4R20PCL200.  My boat, with less than 20 hours, runs 55 mph with 4 of us.  The hole hot is phenomenal!  I am very satisfied.

Ø      A Yamaha Pro Sport Prop would be 14.5 diameter X 21 inch pitch.

Ø      Funky Monkey advises: Yamaha makes the 21" pitch Pro in only one diameter, 14 1/2".  So no worries there.  The most appropriate Pro for that application seems to be the Pro 21, so that would, indeed, be a 14 1/2" x 21".  Since the OFX4 runs bigger diameter, more cup and an extra blade, we run a slightly lower pitch at 20", or 19", depending upon your load, conditions, motor strength, customer expectations, altitude, etc.  Those part numbers would be CLY200OFX4R20, ported 3/8", or CLY200OFX4R19, ported 3/8".

Ø      Flfisherman reports the following:  I was finally able to get out with the new OFX 19 prop and wanted to share my results.  I have the 2.6 200 HPDI on my boat.  The boat had a full tank of gas, three anglers and three days of camping equipment so it was loaded. Hole shot was very good.  It did have some bow rise but much less than my three blade prop.  I was also able to jack the motor up 3 inches, tabs down and got up quickly with good water pressure.  I did not try higher than three inches so I cannot comment but do not see it being a problem.  The boat also handled much better than the three blade.   But I still need to put the tabs down to run some of the twisty creeks in the Everglades.  Overall, for a 22 foot boat, it did very well.  Speed wise, I ran about 1.5 to 2 miles below my RPM, i.e. 38 MPH at 4000 RPM.  As I got above 4300, the smaller pitch began to show and I started to drop off on the speed to RPM ratio.  It was closer to 3 to 4 mph slower than the RPMs. Top speed for me was about 52 mph, 3 miles slower than my three blade, Enertia prop.  Fuel economy was about 4.5 MPG up to 4300 RPMs.  Overall, I really like the prop.  Great hole shot and grip.  The fuel economy was good enough for me.  It is a little slower but that is to be expected and I can live with it since, like everyone else, I rarely run WOT.  The one thing I did notice about the prop is the difference in sound from other props I have tried.  You could really tell this was a big diameter prop, definitely different than other props.

Ø      I use the PowerTech 4 blade, OFX4R20PCL200 prop and it will run 55-56mph at 5500 rpm.  Hole shots are GREAT.  I'm very impressed with this prop and the performance of the boat/motor combo.

o       22PF, Yamaha VMAX 225 HPDI, Jack Plate.

Ø      Funky Monkey advises:  You should be able to get away with a 20, and possibly a 21, depending upon your loads.  The 200 big block generally runs a 19, or 20, while the 250 only takes one more inch to a 21.  I think you would be best off with the 20, and take the extra rpm.  It should have wicked hole shot, and a decent turn of speed.

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What size prop should I run on my 21’ Redfisher with a Yamaha VMAX 250 HPDI?

 

o                   The Yamaha 25" works well for all around. You should see top end around 66-68 with a light load and good hole shot. If your fishing is going to lean more towards live baiting and/or you need a shallow hole shot consider a PowerTech OFX 4 blade in 22 or 23"". You'll loose some top end but not much and your hole shot will be AWESOME. The negative is that your cruise rpm’s will be a little higher at a given speed costing you some fuel economy. The PowerTech VMX 25" 3 blade pushes mine to 68-71 depending on load with a good hole shot. When shopping for props, be sure to get a bow-lifting prop. The 21RF hull is sensitive to weight in the bow as well, and once you get the bow up out of the water she'll really go. Take your time getting used to the speed, it's a rush.

o                   Try a Mercury Revolution 4.  I run the 21 Redfisher with the 250 HPDI.  I own the PowerTech 25 VMX and a 23 OFX.  I prefer everything about the Mercury Revolution 4.  Hole shot is excellent with no blowout.  64 mph tournament loaded with two guys.  5700 rpm trimmed out.  I believe that it is 23 pitch.

o                   I was running the Mercury Revolution 4 on my 21' Maverick Master Angler.  I found it to be the best performing "Out of the Box" prop for my Maverick.  One of my closest friends is a custom prop builder.  He put the Revolution 4 in my hand to give it a try.  It equaled his custom 4 blade cleaver in both hole shot and top speed.  The large diameter and blade combined with low rake lifted the entire hull higher on the water than anything I have ever run.  I had less wetted surface at speed reducing drag and improving speed.  I have found that high rake props do not work well on my particular boat.  Anything over about 22 degrees causes my boat to porpoise badly.  Mike (aka 1031) was having similar issues regarding porpoise and squatting out of the hole.  So I recommended the Revolution 4 to him.  But I think he is running the 21" pitch not 23.  I was running 62 mph with the 21" pitch having an OX-66 200 on my 21 Maverick with zero porpoise issues or need of tabs to settle the boat.  I recently sold the OX-66 200.  I had found a low hour OX-66 150 TRP.   I am in the process of refit and rebuild at this time.

 

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What size prop should I run on my 17 HPXV with a Yamaha 90 2 stroke?

 

o       I am currently running a YM90PTR3R17P and turn 5500 rpm and 44 mph on the GPS with just me on board, full gas on a calm day, with the motor trimmed out to almost the max and very little tabs.  The motor is set as low as possible on the transom.

o       I have the same prop too.  I think I get right at 5500 and speed is 43 to 44 on the GPS.  That is with just me in the boat and trimmed out throwing a rooster tail, with enough tabs to keep from porpoising.  Motor is in the lowest setting.

o       BOB L notes:  I think we all pretty much use the same prop.  The HPX-V requires a bit more work when running.  You must sort of prepare for a turn by lowering the engine trim a bit, and pulling off power.  After I make the turn, I add power and trim up again.  You do not have to play with the trim tabs like some do on the HPX-T.  If you just make a turn at full power with the engine trimmed up, then yes the prop will "blow out", or slip.  I am always working my engine trim and trim tabs on this boat to achieve max performance.  It's just the nature of a high performance hull.

o       BOB L adds:  Rather than considering the benefits of a 4-bladed prop over a 3-bladed, one should probably be considering switching from the PTR series to PowerTech’s SCD series.  The PTR series is a “bow lifter” prop, which supposedly reduces the wetted surface giving you better speed.  PowerTech will tell you to stick with the 3-blade version, although at least one forum member runs the 4-blade with good success.  The YM90PTR3R17P will give you very similar performance to the YM90PTR4R (17P still?), and I would not recommend that you switch to it.  My guess is that you would see no performance gains/differences.  I know that my guide tested the PTR4P, and chose to get the PTR3R instead.  I will try to find out why, but Funky Monkey will probably have the ready answer.  Ft. Myers Marine recommends the PowerTech YM90SCD3R18P on the HPX-V/90 2-stroke. The SCD series is a “stern lifter”, and theoretically is better for running shallow, giving up a little speed over the PTR series.  They apparently feel the SCD is a better match for their shallow, protected redfish waters.  Notice that they mount the 3-bladed SCD, not the 4-bladed.  You might call them to find out why.  Also, the reason that the correct SCD has 18 inches of pitch vs. the PTR’s 17 inches has to do with the diameter of the props.  The PTR series is 13.25 inches in diameter, whereas the SCD is 13.00 inches. The smaller diameter apparently allows the SCD to pull 1 extra inch of pitch over the PTR.  Again, make sure to ask Funky Monkey.  I personally think the SCD series is better suited to the super-shallow running HPX-T which is usually operated in more protected waters.  Theoretically, the PTR3R will give the HPX-V a little extra speed, and raise the bow as much as possible for the rough seas that the HPX-V was built to excel in.  On the other hand, if you are trying to maximize your performance, in your shallow waters, then a stern lifting SCD might be the way to go.  Hopefully, Marcus at PowerTech, can tell you more about the shallow water performance gains.  I would be interested to know just how much shallower you could run with the SCD over the PTR.  Again, only you know what performance characteristics are important in your home waters, so don't let us tell you what prop you "must" use.

o       My prop on my first HPXV was a 3 blade stiletto.  I now have the 4 blade PowerTech YM90PTR4R17P which my dealer mistakenly put on when I ordered your 3 blade version for my new HPXV.  He said to try it for a week and he would replace it if I wanted.  The skiff got on plane and handled much better.  I get about 5400 RPM trimmed correctly and need to use the trim tabs less.  Once I brought a GPS aboard and with full gas and 2 people, it was a tad over 40.  Whatever loss in top end speed if any, is made up in better handling IMO.  I have little problem with blow outs and hole shots compared to the other 3 blade prop and I noticed no detectable reduction of speed but I didn’t use the same GPS on both.

 

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Can a prop from a 2002 150 V MAX HPDI fit a 2004 F150?  I have two different motors and I’d like to be able to use it on both, if need be.

 

o       Marcus responds: “Yes, the prop is interchangeable. That said, the same prop that works optimally for an application with an F150 is not always the best one for the 2-stroke 150.  Each has different power curves and different operating ranges.”     

 

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What should I do to my push pole to keep from getting stuck with that itchy fiberglass?  The outside coating has taken a beating from the sun and now every time I use it, I get what feels like fiberglass all over my chest and arms.

 

o       First, sand the loose and cracked clear coat down the length of the entire pole.  You do not want any deteriorating paint to break loose after refinishing. You will probably not get a paint dealer to recommend anything useful - at least that was my experience. Go to K-Mart and buy their lacquer clear coat.  You will need about four (4) cans.  Figure out a way to support the push pole at both ends. Using the arm rests of two lawn chairs is practical but the wife might throw a fit.  Spray ONE coat on each side and then above for the whole length of the pole. Let dry per paint directions. Rotate the pole 180 degrees and repeat. Repeat this over several days and you will have built up a nice base of clear coat.  In the future, try to keep your push pole out of the sun as much as possible.

o       Use Krylon’s k07006 clear polyurethane spray paint in satin.

o       Use Awlgrip. It is a very expensive solution but is very tough and does not break down in the sun. The pole is 10 years old and I repainted it last year just because the first paint coat was getting worn (black pole & white paint so it was showing wear). Now it is yellow to match the boat. You don't need much Awlgrip, so I would suggest checking marina repair yards to see if they have a partial can you could get. It requires additives (a flow modifier if you brush it and a hardener since it is an epoxy type paint).  West Marine has two part paints (but not Awlgrip - that is only sold commercially) that should work as well.

o       Use a spray epoxy that is designed for appliances. It comes in a single can and is the same to apply as regular spray paints.  But it is much tougher and weather resistant. Lightly sand it down, wipe thoroughly with alcohol, and spray away.

o       A quality push pole will not give you that problem. You can get a 20-21' Moonlighter fiberglass push pole for about $300.  A stiffy hybrid will go for around $450-500. Graphite’s go from $650 up to about $1000.

 

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What are some of your favorite recipes for preparing fish?

 

o       Dino offers the following for Grouper, Mahi Mahi, Snook and Redfish:

v     Blackened

You need to get an outdoor Cajun cooker grill.  Get a seasoned cast iron pan.  Turn it up on the highest you can get and let the cast iron pan turn white hot.  Put some Cajun spices on the fish.  Paul Prudome’s is good.  I make my own.  Throw a stick of butter in the pan.  It will flame and then turn black.  Put in the filets.  It will sear for about 3-5 min on each side (1 inch or so filet).  Turn.  Let sit for another 2 minutes or so.  Squeeze a lemon and you’re done.

v     Oven Searing

Using a non stick pan, add some flour and bread crumbs.  Batter the fish.  Pan sear in some peanut oil.  Pass it about 1 min each side on very high, then put the whole pan in the oven @ 450 degrees for about 6-8 min.  This is for about a 1 inch filet.

v     Frying

I use an equal mixture of cornstarch, flour, breadcrumbs, and cornmeal.  Use the fryer and peanut oil.  Keep at 380 degrees.  You must use a thermometer.  Add pieces slowly so it doesn't lower the temperature.

 

o       For yellow tail snapper, muttons or mangroves

I will either sauté after dusting in a combination of flour and cornmeal in butter, finish with a white while and butter sauce with garlic and shallots.  The snappers are very good fried with the mixture above but yellow tail only takes a few minutes.  Be careful not to over cook.  I don't like to use egg wash or milk mixtures as I feel that it detracts from the freshness of the fish.  Be sure to always season after it comes out of the oil or oven with Paprika, season'd salt, pepper or lemon pepper.  Less is always better.

 

o       On the advice of a friend, Captain Herm did a whole redfish as follows:

Use a 24+ inch redfish, gutted and scaled.  Stuff a couple of pieces of onion and a small piece of lemon in the cavity.  Maybe a little salt and pepper as well.

Cover the edible part with a mixture of 3 egg whites, ice cream salt (about 2-4 lbs.) and a little water just to make a crumbly paste.  Use about 3/4" of salt on the bottom, under the fish, too.  No need to cover the head or tail.

Bake in a pre-heated oven at 400 degrees for 40 minutes.  Stick a fork in the meaty part, and stick it to your tongue.  If it is warm, it is ready to eat.  If it's hot, you have just burned your tongue (sorry!).  Break the salt away from the fish with a small hammer, peel back the skin, and dig in!

This fed four of us with lots of trimmings, and we ate every edible bite.  It is not salty at all, just firm and moist, and very delicious.  I thought there might be something I could do to spice it up a bit, but all three guests (my wife being one of them, and she is my biggest critic) shouted me down when I suggested it!

 

o       After getting some rest following his earlier post, Dino offers:

Ceviche….ala Wana

Ø      I got this from a Peruvian Chef I met in Guatemala.  You need 1 lb of fresh white fish.  Ceviche works best with Corvina from Costa Rica, Chilean sea bass, Snook, Mahi Mahi, Grouper, Snapper (Red, Mangrove or Mutton).  Yellowtail is too delicate.  Be sure to look for any worms in the meat before preparing.  Oily fish like sea trout, mackerel, kingfish etc. does not seem to work well.

Ø      Ingredients needed are:

·          8-10 limes, not lemons.  Juice the limes into a cup.  Press hard to extract all the juice.

·          1 lb of fresh fish cut into about ½ inch cubes.

·          3 fingers of fresh ginger, 2 fingers sliced into 1/8 inch long strips.  Use one finger and peel.  Then grate it into the lime juice.  You will remove the strips before eating when it’s finished.

·          1 medium red onion diced small

·          1/2 red sweet pepper diced small

·          6 cloves of fresh garlic crushed then diced.  The smaller the better.

·          3 tablespoons of finely diced Cilantro or to taste.

·          Salt and pepper to taste.

·          1 hot pepper to taste.  Cut in half for flavor.  Remove seeds.

Ø        In an 8x10 inch glass container (do not use aluminum tray or plastic) add all of the ingredients.  Be sure the fish is just covered.  Mix around thoroughly every 30 min.  Leave at room temperature for about 1 hour to 1.5 hours to allow the lime juice to begin to “cook the fish”.  Don’t leave out on the porch or hot sun, obviously, but, in an air conditioned kitchen at around 70-72 degrees.

Ø        After the 1.5 hours, move to the refrigerator and allow it to complete for about an hour more and it’s complete.  It’s best eaten over saltine crackers with some hot sauce.  You can alternatively chop some fresh green onions and plum tomatoes and serve as an accompaniment.

Ø        As a side, you can also add some shrimp.  To use shrimp in the above, you want to clean the shrimp, cut into the same size pieces and blanch.  .e.g. drop in salted water for about 30 seconds.  Then add to the fish.  Follow the same methods.  A shrimp and fish Ceviche is great.

Ø        I actually prefer the Ceviche a bit cool.  You can keep it all afternoon in the fridge and serve as an appetizer.  My wife and I like it inside an avocado.  I will only keep it for one day.  As with any "raw" seafood product, take care to not leave it out too long.  By keeping it at room temperature for a short period of time, it allows the enzymes to work.  Putting it in the refrigerator slows down the process.  Normally, for a 7 PM dinner, I'll start the Ceviche at around 3 pm and it's perfect for 7.

 

o       Other thoughts by Dino include:

The key to any sauces, etc. is to be sure to always use "high quality" wines for the sauces. Whatever you are drinking should be in the sauce.  No cheap wines.  An inexpensive Italina Pino Grigio from Cavit goes a long way or a Sauvginon Blanc from Australia are your best bets for value right now.  Try and use shallot instead of onions.  Always use fresh garlic instead of powder.  Unsalted butter and use grey sea salt from France.  It's great stuff as well.  Don't forget to always use fresh ground pepper.  It makes a world of difference.

 

o       Tokengirl offers:

Ø      Here's my favorite recipe for fried fish fingers.  It’s great for dolphin, snapper, grouper, hogfish, etc.

Ø      Filet fish and remove all bloodline.  Cut filets into "fingers".

Ø      Have four bowls ready:

1 with lemon juice
1 with flour
1 with beaten egg
1 with Progresso Italian bread crumbs

Ø      Dip the fingers in the lemon juice, then the flour, then the egg, then the breadcrumbs.  Deep fry. Pat with paper towels to absorb any excess oil.  Serve with lime wedges.  This makes a perfect crust on the fish that does not fall apart or come off the fish while frying.

 

o       Try this one.  It’s simple:

Fish fillets include Grouper, Mahi, Snook, Snapper

Ingredients

1 box tempura
1 bag of Panko (Japanese breadcrumbs)
Favorite seasonings (Cajun, season salt, garlic)
2 eggs
Sweeten coconut

Beat eggs and put aside.

Mix some coconut in with the Panko.

Start by coating the fillets in tempura, then in the egg, then into the Panko coconut mix.

Deep fry until golden brown.

You can also take some orange marmalade and heat it up for a dipping sauce or pineapple teriyaki dipping sauce that I got at Publics
or use 1 cup pineapple juice, 3 tablespoons teriyaki sauce, prepared
1/4 teaspoon sesame oil.  Mix together.  Blend well.

 

o       Scottgor notes:  Here is a recipe I use once in a while when I catch a nice smaller king.

Catch a King and keep iced down.
Fillet out, leaving the skin on and cut into steaks.
Wrap bacon around outside edge and secure with tooth picks.
Put steaks in shallow baking dish and pour Thousand Island dressing over them.
Saran wrap dish and put in fridge for an hour or more.
Soak some hickory or mesquite chips.
Fire up the grill.  Get the chips smoking, then cook the steaks.
Medium heat till the steaks split easily with a fork, usually 4-5 minutes a side.
Skin comes off and onto a plate.

   

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 Where can I get quality rod holders for my poling platform?

 

o       TACO at Bass Pro Shops

o       Lee’s Tackle, Inc.  They can be purchased at a lower price at Boater’s World.

o       Smith Rod Holders at Boater's World.

 

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Where can I buy those flat blade rod holders that attach to the gunnels sides?

 

o       Birdsall Marine.  The portable rod holder can be used on any vertical surface. The receiver is made of high-density polyethylene and is simply screwed to the vertical surface. The rod holder with its flat blade slides into the receiver.  One can buy additional receivers to allow multiple locations to be used.

 

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 How do I remove rust stains from the gel coat?

o                   I've used Starbrite hull cleaner found at Wal-Mart with excellent results on small rust stains around hardware.  Wipe or spray on and hose off.

o                   If it's a mild stain, use cheap toilet bowl cleaner, straight with no water, or Muriatic acid – aka Hydrochloric acid.

o                   Magic Eraser will take it right off with little or no scrubbing.

o                   There is some stuff called "Wink" in a brown bottle that is a rust remover. Always worked for me.

o                   For the heavy rust, I use FSR.

o                   Bar Keepers Friend from any Wal-Mart or grocery store.

o                   Most all of the mild rust removers have oxalic acid as the main ingredient and are safe on Gelcoat.  Just wash off when finished.

o                   Interlux Stain Remover! Good stuff.  It makes the hull look new.

 

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How do I fill and bleed my Teleflex steering system?

 

o       Here how Teleflex instructs you how to do it.  Teleflex Fill and Purge

o       Hobo offers the following “non-messy” procedure:

1.      I really don’t understand why everyone seems to be making such a big deal out of this task.  It is a very simple and clean, one-man job.  All it takes is a little time.

2.      If you bought your boat new, included in the little zippered canvas bag with all your factory paperwork, plugs, stoppers, standpipes, keys, etc. is a Teleflex fluid add/bleed kit.  It consists of a short piece (about 12"-14") of clear tubing (about 3/8"-1/2" diameter), a plastic, tapered-spout bottle cap with a small hole in the end, a plastic screw/barbed fitting will be in one end of the tubing, and a thumb tack.

3.      The male threads on the fitting will screw right into the Teleflex fitting on your console right next to the helm.  If you don't have a plastic transparent quart container of Teleflex power-steering fluid you either need to purchase one from Boaters’ World, West Marine, etc. or find yourself a similar sized container (transparent so you can see the fluid level inside) with the same sized pour spout on top

4.      Remove the regular cap then screw the tapered-spout cap.  Next slide the other end of the tubing over this spout and using duct-tape, string, cord, etc.

5.      Hang the bottle of fluid up-side-down.  The bottom of the bottle has to be higher than the fill spout on the boat.

6.      Next, punch a small hole in the bottom of the plastic bottle (now on the top).  This hole is allows air to enter the bottle, permitting the fluid to enter/leave the bottle without becoming vacuum locked.

7.      Now you are ready to begin the actual filling and/or bleeding process.  All you have to do is begin turning your helm all the way to one side then all the way to the other side.  Repeat this back-and-to process until all the bubbles in the lines have been replaced with fluid.  You can easily see the bubbles of air as they rise through the tubing and into the bottle.  You can also feel when all the slack and "sponginess" is gone from the action on the helm.  This may take many cycles to pump all the air out but this is a painless, clean and easy method to bleed these lines.  Obviously this process works better in warmer weather (summer time rather than winter) because the viscosity of the hydraulic fluid is affected by the temperature.  This whole process will usually take no more than 20-30 minutes.

8.      When finished, remove the duct tape holding the bottle aloft, hold a finger over the vent hole you punched in the container's bottom, turn it over (right side up) and remove the tubing from the tapered spout.  You will have to pour any remaining fluid into another container for storage (empty plastic 2-liter Coke bottle, etc).  Save this now-empty bottle (with the vent hole) for future use.

9.      Now, unscrew the fill hose & fitting from the console fill port.  You will need a couple of paper towels to wipe up any spillage from the console face.  Before replacing the cap over this fill port, BE SURE YOU DO THIS NEXT STEP.

10.  Using the eraser end of a pencil, the end of a Philips screwdriver, etc. insert one of these down into the port.  This will displace a nominal amount of the fluid from the storage reservoir allowing for thermal expansion of the fluid on those hot summer days.  The cap is vented and no matter how hard it is tightened it will still vent this reservoir AND WILL LEAK FLUID IF THE LEVEL IS TOO HIGH.  Use more paper towels when using this displacement method to catch and wipe up the fluid as it is being displaced.

11.  There have been numerous threads about fluid leaking from this fill port especially during hot weather.  Well, this displacement technique is the cure.  Remove some of the excess fluid, then it won't be leaking out the vent hole in the cap when things get warm.  VERY SIMPLE!!!

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Why is my hydraulic steering hard to turn at speed but turns easily at idle?

 

o         HOBO advises:  While making way, adjust your motor trim up/down.  I believe you will find a point where your motor torque will not cause excessive steering resistance in either direction. 

 

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How do I determine what type of thread is on my steering wheel shaft?

 

o       HOBO notes:

1.      A hydraulic helm steering nut is 5/8-18 UNF threads.

2.      The Rack & Pinion no-feedback cable steering (On a Tailfisher) steering nut is 1/2-20 NNF.

3.      The keyed taper part of the helm shaft is the same regardless.  This means that the actual steering wheel will fit either system.  It's the nut that holds the wheel onto the helm column that is different.

4.      It shouldn't be that difficult to measure if you don't know if you have hydraulic or mechanical steering.  Hydraulic steering will be 5/8" diameter and mechanical steering will be 1/2" diameter.

5.      You can use a folding rule, or tape ruler.

6.      For really accurate measurements, you may use a slide caliper, dial caliper or a micrometer to measure the thread diameter.

7.      The slide caliper will most likely be graduated in fractions of an inch while the dial caliper and micrometer will be in thousandths (0.000) of an inch.  The 1/2" will be 0.500" and the 5/8" will be 0.625".

 

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What tools do you carry on board with you?

 

o       Marine tool bag from Craftsman.

o       A small tool pouch, 10" crescent, channel locks, multi-purpose 101 tool, flat & Phillips screw drivers.

o       2 crescents, channel locks, ratchet wrench w/extender for trim skeg anode(?), flat & Phillips screwdrivers, needle nose pliers, wire cutters for hook/crab trap removal, a couple of box wrenches, knife, clamps, electrical tape, fuses, etc.

o       A prop wrench, also.

o       Allen keys on a ring and a push-pull drill.

o       Cork screw for the non-screw cap bottles.

 

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What tools do you carry on your tow vehicle for trailer repair?

 

o       Large wrenches, cotter pins, hub kits, etc

o       A small jack stand and a 3 ton floor jack in the back of the truck for road trips.

o       $29 tool kit from Pep Boys, duck tape, some hose clamps, wire connectors, etc.

o       Vacuum pack the tools after you spray them down with a little oil (even olive oil works), and then they will be ready when you need them.

 

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What is the technique and equipment required for towing a flats boat behind a mother ship?

 

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company states “We have many customers that tow skiffs behind larger boats.  Each application is different as far as towing length, speed, etc.  We have installed many tow rings/ wishbones, etc.  I suggest having a wishbone made for towing.  This piece installs below your bow eye and pulls lower - which is a good thing.  What you have to be very careful of, is taking on water in rough conditions.  Towing a non-self bailing boat is very risky.  For self bailing skiffs, you might want to consider having a second, higher set of self bailing ports installed.  This really helps rid the boat of any cockpit water.

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company also states “The "wishbone" towing bridle may be installed on an existing unit. I know of one manufacturer here in S Florida that makes and installs these. You could also install the towing eyes as these are easier to install.  If you would like the information regarding the wishbone please let me know and I'll email it to you.”

o       Regarding the length of the tow rope, it should be long, around 150’ and then adjusted to the wave periods such that it is timed with the mother ship.

 

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What size and kind of trolling motor should I install on my Mirage HPX?

 

o       I use a MinnKota RT55 AP/CP on my HPX-T.  It's a 12 volt motor, so only one battery is necessary.  If I used the motor all day in heavy currents, it's possible that a 24 volt motor would be better.  There are lots of opinions on the relative advantages of a tiller control motor versus the Auto Pilot/Co-Pilot.  These can all be boiled down to "Keep it Simple" vs. "Great features".

o       I have the MinnKota 55 compact mount.  It's nice!  I used it today for about 4 hrs straight and didn't even hurt the battery.  I also have the quick release mount so I take it off every night.

o       I have had great service from Motor Guide on 3 different boats.  I have a 12v Great White, 54# thrust, 50" shaft, bow mount with quick release.  I run everything off one battery and have never had a problem.

o       All you need is a 12v with a 27 series battery.  I have yet to run mime down after fishing all day in Jax with the current.  I have the MotorGuide 55# and love it.  Zero problems.  I have had both TMs and never had a problem with either.

o       I’ve noticed several of you are using a single battery set-up with HPX's.  I have just had MK 55 QR installed on my HPX.  I went with single Deka series 27 AGM in console.  My rigger is telling me that a single battery is not adequate and not safe.  But think I have heard Hobo and now several of you extol virtues of a single battery in the HPX.  I have learned how to remove the plastic flywheel cover for an emergency hand crank in the event the battery should run down.

o       I have the newer Motor Guide remote version similar to the MK co pilot series.  One big advantage to these motors is that they take up a lot less deck space which was the selling point for me.  The unit overall seems as though it is smaller overall and you don’t have the handle sticking out into the middle of the deck.

o       Here's a shot to show what little deck space a MinnKota RT55 AP/CP can take up on a deck. I also had the shaft cut down to 38".

 

o       I  have the Deka, aka Eastpenns, group 27 batteries and they are wonderful.  I use 2 for my bigger trolling motor and boat, but am fairly confident they will last quite a while for you.  You can always add a small battery just for backup cranking with a 1, 2 and both selector switch.  Or  you can forget the battery and just carry a small portable jump starter from Pep Boys, Discount Auto or WalMart to start the motor just in case.  I paid $60 for mine at Cosco a year ago.  I leave it in my car and put it in the boat every trip.  It’s peace of mind.  Here is a nice one at Cabelas.  http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/ produc...

 

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Has anyone found a trailer light brand that lasts?  I am on going on my third set of taillights. They continue to fill up with water after 3-4 months.

 

o                   It would help to put the lights at the top of the guide poles, and always unhook the electrical plug from your trailer to your truck when you put the trailer in the water. The current running through really shortens the electrical life when powered in the water.  It corrodes insanely fast. Look for a good sealed LED light and if you can seal it with clear silicone caulk or something along those lines if you have any holes at the base.

o                   HAMFISTED advises:  Are yours the square shaped lights?  I've had friends that are having problems with those too.  But I've had the low profile "SeaSense" brand that Bass Pro sells for $60 on my trailer for about 4 years and not one problem.  They have a lifetime warranty anyway.  Those square shaped ones might be the cheap Unified Marine brand and they don't seem to hold up well at all, especially in saltwater (one year warranty???).  But try the low profile SeaSense LEDs.  I think you'll be much happier.  Make sure you do use the heat shrink sealed butt connectors to make your wire connections too.  Good luck.

SeaSense Low Profile LED Trailer Lights from Bass Pro

 

o                   POL4FISH counters:  I've gone through three sets of lights too.  Unified Marine is AKA SeaSense Marine.  I had their square LED lights and they too filled up with water.  They will replace them but how many times do you want to do it?  I also had 4 of their flexible trailer ID LED light bars all of which failed from water intrusion.  I talked to several top people at the company and the newest set of LED's they sent me, according to them "is supposed to get water inside the light".  I thought that the water is supposed to be kept out? 
I found that Optronics makes the best, problem free lights with a lifetime warranty also.  It makes no sense to me if an LED light is supposed to last 100.000 hours, be waterproof, and then find that the new square SeaSense LED lights at BPS have four screws and a gasket covering the LED's.  SeaSense claims it's in case you break the lens it can be changed.  After 15 years of boating, I’ve never broke a lens.  IMHO, there is no quality at all with SeaSense.

o                   HAMFISTED adds:  I haven't really seen anybody with the Optronic LED trailer lights, but they generally make good stuff. Optronic LED Trailer Lights . Probably worth checking out if you're not happy with the low profile SeaSense lights.  It’s good to see other companies starting to offer choices.

 

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I’d like to know how well the Minn Kota Autopilot with the wireless Copilot works.  Do you still have the ability with the Auto Pilot to manually steer, i.e. literally grab the motor head and move it around with your hand?

 

o       I like the AP/CP for its features.  It is also much smaller on the deck. You can cut the shaft down since the head does not have to be at a convenient height to operate when it's deployed. The AP/CP features are pretty cool, particularly if you like to operate the boat from the back while a guest fishes up front.

o       However, the standard RT is appealing because of its simplicity.  It has fewer parts to worry about.  Normally I'd be in favor of the "keep it simple" approach, but the size of the AP/CP was more the deciding factor for me.

o       There is no provision to turn the AP manually.

o       I never felt the need to control the motor manually. When deployed to the full depth, the control head is down there just above deck level. It would definitely be more awkward to squat down to reach the control head than it is to hit a couple of buttons on the remote. Another neat thing about the AP/CP is that because of the autopilot/compass heading feature, I often go minutes without making any adjustment at all.  You don't really need to be near the motor or mess with it much once you've set a general direction and speed.  AP or no AP, they're both great motors and I could be happy with either one.

o       The remote would be a pain if it didn't "auto-steer".  But that's the beauty of it.

o       I haven't had any trouble with it, but I'm probably just asking for it now!  It's been suggested that the source of some of the problems with the Copilot is in the plug connection.  The suggested solution is putting corrosion resistant grease in the plug.

 

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How important will the positioning of two relatively heavy items be on the HPX17T?  I will soon be adding a 52 lb thrust Minn Kota trolling motor and a 6’ Power Pole.  Can you put the push pole and the trolling motor on the same side of the HPX?

 

o       You can definitely put the push pole and trolling motor on the same side. Doing so, helps to keep the left side of the deck clean for stripping fly line.

o       Certainly, alternating side for the Trolling Motor and Power Pole will help to properly distribute the weight. 

o       In considering your poling style, you have to ask: “How often do I switch from right to left?” If the answer is “frequently”, then worrying about your weight on either side is not a factor.  Your actual weight can be a factor, being that the heavier you are and the farther from the centerline you are will affect the level of the boat.

 

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Which manufacturer is better, Minn Kota or MotorGuide?

 

o       They are both decent products but both have their issue.  It's a matter of personal preference, particularly as it relates to the preference of the installer. The more features, gadgets, and gizmos you add, the more problems that will arise.  Keeping the motor simple is a good idea.

o       After speaking to a large repair shop who handles both, they said don't buy MinnKota.  They have over 20 units in the shop waiting for circuit boards with some waiting for months. They strongly recommend MotorGuide over Minn Kota.

o       Mike from Master Repair, is a huge Minn Kota supporter and seems to strongly favor them over MotorGuide.  He is one of the largest, if not the largest MinnKota dealer.  He probably gets priority parts vs. other repair shops which may lessen the pain of out of stock problems.

 

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Who makes the best trolling motor mount for my application?  I plan to have my trolling motor off most of the time.  I want one that is small, flush and secure.  It needs to be lockable for the times when I travel, leaving the boat and motor outside and unattended.  I would rather not take it off each time, although a system that is easy to remove would be ok for secure storage.

 

o       Minn Kota has a system that meets your needs.  The Composite Quick-Release Trolling Motor Mounting Bracket was developed by Mike at Master Repair.  You can get it from Master Repair and some of the large retailers such as Bass Pro Shops.

o       I have the Minn Kota Quick Release MKA-21 on my 16’RedFisher with the MinnKota 55PD/AP Trolling Motor. With the Trolling Motor removed from the boat, all that remains is a plate a little smaller than the size of a VHS cassette.  Nothing to snag the fly line. It is a good strong mount.

o       You can use a medium size padlock to secure.

 

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What is the best plug and receptacle to use for my trolling motor?

 

o       The Power Winch plug.  It can be bought from Mike at Master Repair.  He quit using the Marinco plugs.

                       

 

 

o       The receptacle that comes on the pathfinder is known to have problems.

o       Be very careful with those trolling motor plugs.  I recently had mine catch fire while on the water.  I now have a new item on my check list.  “Read instructions on how to operate the fire extinguisher before every trip”.  I had minor damage to the boat around the anchor locker.  I can only guess that after two years, it had a partial short that finally built up enough resistance to heat it up and cause a fire.  Make sure that your trolling motor electrical connection has a 50 amp re-settable circuit breakers on per MotorGuide instructions.  I had to buy a new hatch cover and now you can't tell it ever happened.  Special thanks to the Maverick folks who helped me out.

 

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What is the difference between the Minn Kota “Bow Guard” and the “Latch and Door” designs?

 

o       The Bow Guard has a large spring that will "break away" if you hit something.  It just protects the shaft somewhat.  With the Latch and Door, you can take the trolling motor off of the mount if you desire.  It tends to squeak like heck any time you turn it.  Use white lithium grease on the latch collar or keep a bottle of AmorAll on the boat to quiet it down.  The main benefit of the Latch and Door is you can take the motor off of the mount if needed.  If you have a quick release mount, then everything comes off leaving a much cleaner deck.

 

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On what side of the bow should I mount the Trolling Motor?

 

o       Most mount it on the left side (port).  When motor is in water, it will be on right (starboard).

o       if you are a fly fisher, buy the quick release mount.  You can then take motor off and have a clean snag free surface.  If you fly fish and use the TM at same time, then get a basket for catching the fly line.

o       I opted for a starboard mount as my Push Pole was already on the starboard side and I didn't want to clutter up both sides of the bow.  As a right-hander, and a newbie fly fisherman, I wanted to keep the port side uncluttered, especially when I use a stripping basket.

o       My next project is to make another MK Quick Release mount (male side) and mount it on the stern, port gunnel. This will be used to stow the Trolling Motor out of the way when poling.

o       Skip from the Maverick Boat Company notes: “Most do mount the TM on the port side to hang over the starboard side.  That seems to be changing.  For years, we only installed the backing plate on the port side.  We now install one on each side.

o       I have an 03 Red Fisher and their are mounting plates on both sides.

 

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Will the Minn Kota Quick Release mount work for Motor Guide Motors?

 

o       Yes, but be careful to determine Quick Release model you should purchase. 

 

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 How do I connect my 24 volt Trolling Motor?

 

o       Gatorgringo made the following schematic:  Note that this a 2 bank charger setup with no charger wiring for the starting battery. 

 

                                        

 

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